Things that scare dogs on Halloween


Who Needs Ghost Stories?!
Guest RE-blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

Happy Halloween everybody!

Mom said I could write another post for Halloween this year, but she hogged our computer so much I couldn’t get it done.  Sheesh!

But I didn’t want to give up the chance to say hello to all my fur and feather pals (and their two-legses), so I decided to try the “press this” thing on the one I finally convinced her to let me write last year.

I even repeated the links to some of the blogs of my buds on the bottom of this “reblog”, so you could get to be friends with them too.

Some of my Mom’s two-legses friends have some pretty cool Halloween offerings this year, and there are links to a few of those below as well.

I hope you like my Halloween post (I promise that it’s A LOT shorter than most of Mom’s stuff) – and that you’ll let me know that you took the time to click over to the original to see some of the photos I included.

If they weren’t so scary they’d be really funny!


Scary things done to dogs

TinkerToy here, reminding you not judge me for that. (Remember, I didn’t get much of a vote, and Killer wasn’t on the menu.)

That’s NOT me over there, by the way. It’s one of the scary things — done to a dog that looks a lot like me.

Mom wasn’t planning to let me at the computer for a few more weeks last year. BUT, since my first ever post, Blogging Tips from a Shih Tzu got more comments than any of hers, she couldn’t exactly think up a good reason to say no.

This is a reblog of my second ever blog post — and it’s about the scariest thing about Halloween.

NOT what you think!

I’ll bet you were thinking I was going to blog about the hateful two-legs who abandon dogs, the horrors of puppy mills, or dog-abuse.

While those are ALL very scary things indeed, my Halloween post is going to focus on what the two-legs do to us on this one particular day each year — just because they think it’s funny, and just because they can.

Yep – dog costumes!

Even before I was born, Mom had a Pinterest Board called Deck the Dog where she pinned all sorts of pictures of puppies and dogs dressed in all manner of outfits. She said it made her laugh. (Weird sense of humor, this two-leg I live with.)

THEN, shortly after she heard about the Halloween Costume Party at my Cheers bar down the street, I caught her looking for “ideas” – and not very many of them looked like pictures of anything she’s thinking about for her.

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Smoking: Additional reasons why it’s SO hard to quit


Nicotine and
self-medication

NOT what you think this post is going to be about!

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another post in the Walking A Mile in Another’s Shoes Series

It’s National Cancer Prevention Month!
American Institute for Cancer Research

A relatively new study on nicotine and self medication (linked below in the Related Content) prompted me to revisit the topic of smoking.

Why do so many of us continue to do it?

WHY does it seem to be so difficult to put those smokes down — despite the black-box warnings that now come on every pack sold in the USA?

Science rings in

The link between self-medication and smoking really isn’t news to me, by the way, but some scientific validation is always reassuring.

An article I published early-ish in 2013 can be found HERE – where I discussed the relationship between nicotine’s psycho-stimulation, the brain, and the concept of “core benefits.”

For those of you who enjoy a bit of sarcasm with your information, it’s written in a rah-ther snarky tone toward the self-righteous – who, because of the way the brain responds, actually make it more difficult for people who need to quit with their nags and nudges.

Even if you don’t, you’ve probably never come across this particular point of view anywhere else as an explanation for why it can be such a struggle to quit — especially for those of us who are card-carrying members of Alphabet City.

I’ll give you just a little preview of what I mean by “snarky” below
(along with Cliff Notes™ of most of the info, for those of you with more interest than time).


HOLD YOUR HORSES!!

Sit on your hands if you must, but do your dead-level best to hear me out before you make it your business to burn up the keyboard telling me what I already know, okay?

I PROMISE YOU I have already heard everything
you are going to find it difficult not to flame at me.

There is not a literate human being in the United States (or the world) who hasn’t been made aware of every single argument you might attempt to burn into the retinas of every smoky throated human within any circle of influence you are able to tie down, shout down, argue down or otherwise pontificate toward.

NOW – can you listen for once?  I’m not going to force you to inhale.  I’m not even trying to change your mind. I would like to OPEN it a crack, however.

If you sincerely want to protect your friends and loved ones while you rid the world of the deleterious effects of all that nasty second-hand smoke, wouldn’t it make some sense to understand WHY your arguments continue to fall on deaf ears?

Unless you truly believe that saying the same thing for the two million and twenty-second time is going to suddenly make a difference —

or unless you don’t really care whether people stop smoking
or not as long as you get to rant and rave about it

 — wouldn’t it make some sense to listen for a moment to WHY some of the people are still smoking?

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Grief and Acceptance


Additional information about Diagnosis and Grief
(reblogged from Picnic with Ants)

 Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
An addition to the Diagnosis & Grief Series
(c) all rights reserved by the author of the original post

A rare exception

I don’t reblog many posts because I don’t believe, even though it is getting better, that the WordPress reblog function is particularly ADD/EFD-friendly. THIS article, however, is a well-written addition to my own Diagnosis and Grief Series, so I’m making an exception.

My hope is that any of my readers who are coping with grief following diagnoses of physical as well as mental conditions will be helped by reading the post begun below, as well as the comments left by her active readership community — in particular the information on (and provided links about) Prolonged Grief Disorder.

Even though I don’t cover it often on ADDandSoMuchMORE.com, I’m sure that many of you have noticed the negative impact on ADD/EFD challenges such as activation, attention and focus that accompanies illnesses of other types, even when the illness is a temporary blip on the health continuum.

If any of you who are struggling with a combination of chronic health issues are unfamiliar with the Picnic with Ants blog (or its author), waste no time jumping over to see what she has to offer.
xx,
mgh
(Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
– ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
“It takes a village to educate a world!”

Picnic with Ants

When people think of grief they often think of death, they don’t think about grieving over other significant losses.  Those of us who have had major losses due to chronic illness know all too well that we grieve those losses.

The five stages of normal grief that were first proposed by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book “On Death and Dying” are: Denial, Bargaining, Depression, Anger, and Acceptance.  Kübler-Ross describes these stages as being progressive, you needed to resolve one stage before moving on to the next.  This is no longer thought to be true.  It is accepted that most people who have loss go through states of grief but it is not linear nor is it finite.

The 

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ADD Positively Top Ten reblogged


Madelyn Griffith-Haynie says:

I am trying the “reblog” feature for the first time — this is a “Top Ten” you will love – from the ADDPositely blog. (We’ll find out how “reblog” works together.)

In typical ADD fashion, Top “ten” became 33 – complete with the great graphics shown above (not a lot of words, so a quick and funny read).

Enjoy this post – and check out her blog. It’s great!

— xx, mgh

PS. UGH!  IMHO, WordPress “reblog” is a REALLY inflexible (and totally ADD-unfriendly) “feature”  — especially the way it handles graphics! Tried it – HATE IT!

SO sorry!  I’ll figure out some other way if I want to share someone else’s post again. (MEANWHILE, click the “Related Content from around the ‘net” at the bottom of the posts I write for you).

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