When Fear Becomes Entrenched & Chronic


Chronic Anxiety & PTSD
Understanding Fear & Anxiety – Part 2

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
from the Self-Health Series

When what happened leaves marks

broken-legIf you broke your leg, you’d go get it set, right?

Whether it was a little break or something catastrophic that required an operation and pins, you would feel “entitled” to go for professional help and would have no doubt that you needed it, right?

While you were in a cast, you’d probably have the good sense not to try to walk on that broken leg. Most of the people around you would be able to understand without explanation that you needed crutches to get around.  Right? It would go without saying that you had to take it easy while you healed.

EVEN if you broke your leg doing something stupid that was entirely your own fault, you would probably feel very little shame about having a broken leg – a little embarrassed, perhaps, but you’d still allow yourself to get what you needed to heal.

YET, when the problem is mental, we tend to try to soldier on alone. 

  • Maybe we think things are not “bad enough” that we are entitled to professional help.
  • Maybe the stigma still associated with the term “mental illness” stops us cold.
  • We probably find ourselves struggling with the concern that others might believe we are weak or over-reacting if we can’t seem to pull things back together alone.
  • Perhaps we have collapsed psychological difficulties with “crazy,” and we certainly don’t want to believe we are crazy!

The only thing that is CRAZY is denying ourselves the help it would take to manage whatever it is that we are struggling with so that we can get back to being our own best selves – and most of us are a little bit crazy in that way.  I know I am, in any case.

In one masterful stroke of unconscious black and white thinking, we label ourselves powerless when we are unable to continue on without help, struggling against impossible situations sometimes, as things continue to worsen — if we’re lucky.

  • Because when things continue to get worse, it will eventually become obvious that we are clearly not okay.
  • We’ll eventually reach a place where it will be impossible to deny ourselves the help we need to heal.
  • If we’re not lucky, we are able to continue living life at half mast: limp-along lives that could be SO much healthier and happier.
  • If we’re not lucky, our mental reserves will be worn out by limping along, and we are likely to reach a place where it seems as if our dominant emotion is anger, or we will slide into chronic, low-level depression – or worse.

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Healthy Minds have Healthy Hearts


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by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
An article in the Advocacy Series

It’s the 22nd annual
MENTAL HEALTH
AWARENESS WEEK

This Year’s National Day of Prayer for
Mental Illness Recovery and Understanding
is
 Tuesday, October 9, 2012.

In 1990, the U.S. Congress established the first week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week [MIAW] in recognition of NAMI‘s efforts to increase mental illness literacy so that we can ALL partner in mental health advocacy.

Since 1990, mental health advocates across the country have joined
together during the first full week of October to s-p-r-e-a-d the w-o-r-d.

What word?

That a sign of Mental Health is a refusal to stigmatize Mental Illness!

We ALL need to to help with a global reframe
and a shift toward kindness and understanding.

Pass it on

REMEMBER: ADD Awareness Week is next — October 14-20, 2012

MentalHealthAwarenessRibbon ‎– designed and introduced on May 9, 2007 by
Agis Zorgverzekeringen to create awareness for mental health in the
Netherlands in relation to changes in legislature as of January 1, 2008.

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