Improving the Quality of Your Care


Don’t make your Doctors “guess”

© By Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T., MCC, SCAC
Foundational Concepts in the Self-advocacy Series
Improving the Quality of Your Care – Part 1 of 2

ComplaintHorseComplaint vs Feedback

In an earlier article, In Praise of Complainers-Reframing Complaining, I underscored the importance of feedback to getting our needs met — that, without our negative feedback, the rational assumption is that “all is well.”

If that’s not the case, I went on to say, we MUST “complain” if we ever expect more functionality and life satisfaction than we have right now.  HOWEVER . . .

HOW we provide feedback – and to whom – makes a difference.

This portion of the Self-advocacy Series will begin to take a look at how to provide effective feedback to your care providers.

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In Praise of Complainers


Reframing Complaining

© By Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T., MCC, SCAC
Foundational Concepts in the Self-advocacy Series

ComplaintHorseYou have no right to complain . . .

How many times have we heard that one?  What in the world is that supposed to mean?

OF COURSE we have a “right” to complain! We all maintain that right, regardless of circumstance.  It’s feedback — it communicates to others that something is not right with our universe.

Is the expectation that we will suffer in silence?

Feedback is an essential component of the success of any life lived in the company of others. Nothing works for everybody. How else are we likely to get our needs met, if we don’t provide negative feedback when something isn’t working for us?

Whether one is able to offer feedback in a “charge-neutral” fashion or not, without our negative feedback, the rational assumption is that “all is well.”

If that’s not the case, we MUST “complain” if we ever expect more functionality and life satisfaction than we have right now.

HOW we complain makes a difference, however.

The Self-advocacy Series will take a look at some of the more effective ways to get your needs met, but until you get over some unconscious fear of “being seen as a complainer,” you probably will find it difficult to use any of them.

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Of Bribery and Labels


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

Reframing the Bribery Label

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

If you’ve been reading this blog for very long, you know how much I sincerely dislike labeling of any kind — especially those labels that come from personal opinion (the kind that seem to squeak right under our conscious “judgment” radar the moment a label slips into common usage).

The labeling category is where the term “bribery” falls for me, and this article is my attempt to reframe it before it slides across the line into the make-wrong category.

Make-wrong is a term used in the coaching community to refer to judgments that might as well be saying, “Anybody sane knows there is a right and a wrong way to do life, and this communication identifies an item on THE unacceptable list” (in contrast to one’s personal unacceptable list).

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Distinctions: Coaching vs.Therapy


Some of the DIFFERENCES
between

The THERAPIST
and The COACH

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T., MCC, SCAC
Dr. Lee Smith,
CTP, MCC  ©1994, ’95, ’02, ’11, ’15

Obviously, the well-being of the client is the context for this discussion, and determining what kind of assistance is appropriate is an important question.

Why?

Because most coaches are not trained therapists and most therapists are not trained coaches.  


•  For potential clients:
 the question is, Which do I choose and how do I decide?

•  For helping professionals: the issue becomes when, what, and to which professional to refer.

• When ADD is part of the picture, (or any of the Executive Functioning** dysregulations), the differences between an ADD Coach and any other kind of coach becomes important as well.

**(Check out the Executive Functioning LinkList
jump to the one you are most interested in reading,
or read them ALL – opens in a new window/tab)

Beginning at the beginning

Let’s begin the process of differentiating therapy and coaching by focusing only on the items in common with all coaches, without regard to specialties.

At the end of this article are some links that will help you understand some key differences that only comprehensively-trained, brain-based ADD Coaches understand how to work with.  In a future article I will address the issue ADD Coaching differences more directly.

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