The Brain Science Podcast turns TEN!


TEN years and still going strong

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another article in the Brain Based Resources Series
with content reblogged from an article back in 2012

“On the Brain Science Podcast we explore how recent scientific discoveries are unraveling age-old mysteries, such as intelligence, emotions, personality, and memory.

We also look at why the brain is much more complex than any computer yet devised.” ~ Dr. Ginger Campbell

The Podcast for Everyone who has a Brain

I have been singing the praises of Dr. Ginger Campbell’s fascinating Brain Science Podcast for years now.

It is one of my very favorite ways of keeping step as science marches on.

Given that she is currently celebrating her Ten Year Anniversary, I decided it was time for me to introduce it anew.

I have many new readers since I wrote my first article urging everyone to check it out.

If you are not already listening, you are missing a fascinating brain-based resource that will make you feel like you have your own neuro-PhD after listening to a few episodes.

In the years since her podcast launched, Ginger has interviewed quite a few leading scientists and writers, many of whom have now become subscribers themselves.  I have described a mere FIVE of these below, hoping to whet your appetite for more.

Woven throughout her interviews are episodes with book summaries and topic-focused informational “lectures” in her own voice, and supporting all is a web-based discussion forum, a FaceBook Group, and her comprehensive website.  Her ShowNotes are top-notch too.

My much earlier unsolicited RAVE offers brief descriptions and links to particular interviews of individuals whose names long-time readers of ADDandSoMuchMORE.com will recognize from articles here.

I hope that you will jump over to skim that post as well – and jump from there to Ginger’s Brain Science Podcast website to give yourselves a real treat.

Click to read: Brain Science Podcast: REALLY Good Stuff!

For ANYONE who has a brain

There are now over 130 interview episodes available, the show has been ranked #1 on iTunes™, and BSP has enjoyed well over 2 million downloads.

  • It’s so popular because she manages somehow to appeal to long time “neuro-geeks” and newbie non-scientists alike.
  • She makes the content easily accessible, not only by adding her own comments to back-fill information that she understands but WE might not – but also by pointing to resources and other podcasts in the series to add additional depth to the conversation for those who want more.

The most recent episodes of the series can be streamed for free, and can also be downloaded to play on another device without charge. Although donations are appreciated, for those who can swing it, you can download several years worth of brain candy for absolutely nothing.

For those of you who prefer to read (or for those who want to do both), a transcript of each episode is available in pdf format for a measly dollar.  I happily pay $1.00 for my pdf downloads — they’re more than worth it!

You can EVEN listen on your smart phone. If you want to stream to your cell, there’s an ap available for an extremely reasonable charge.

Listen while you work, exercise, or relax

While there’s nothing quite like reading the book to add depth to your learning, one of the things I LOVE about this podcast is the intelligence of the interview.

Not only is Ginger a wonderful interviewer, she does her homework before she speaks with each guest. She asks just the right questions to make sure her listeners get the “meat” of the content – and she gives her guests PLENTY of time to develop a thought.

  • She also does everything she can to make sure that everyone in her target audience (“anyone with a brain”) gets full value out of each episode.
  • For interviews of concepts and ideas that might be more complex than new listeners could be expected to grasp on first listening, immediately following the interview itself she returns to summarize, and to cover anything that she feels needs a bit of extra explanation.

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Brains Need SYSTEMS to Develop


Learning CHANGES the Structure of the Brain:

Impossible in the face of chaos

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC

“You don’t cure a different organization of the brain;
you find ways and strategies of helping that brain learn [. . .] in a different way.
It’s not about cure, it’s about teaching different ways.

~ Maryanne Wolf
reading expert & author of Proust and the Squid

Building a Brain

While it is true that no two brains develop in a manner that is exactly the same, babies come into this world with a brain specialized for learning – a pattern-recognition device designed to bootstrap learning into a structure of additional patterns.

The brain develops in a manner not dissimilar to the way in which a computer uses certain hardwired sub-routines to locate and activate still more code that allows for the loading and interpretation of additional programs — which facilitates their use for creating new ideas.

The human brain builds the new structures and networks it needs to allow it to continue to learn.  The process by which it does that work is known as neuroplasticity.

Not all that long ago, most of the science-crowd mistakenly believed that there was a relatively early window in which neuroplasticity operated. It was once thought that all of the neurons our brains were ever going to have developed within that window, and the systems the brain used to learn were set after a particular point in childhood.

Baby brains develop amazingly quickly

If you’ve ever spent any time at all around an infant, you might recall their unfocused stare and their unselfconscious movements and facial expressions.

It may not be immediately apparent to parents who spend day to day time with the baby, but adults who visit only occasionally are usually amazed at how much more that child is able to interact with the world each time.

Suddenly, it seems, that tiny child is able to focus on an object of fascination.  S/he responds to the direction of a particular sound and reaches for things. The baby exhibits what adults recognize as curiosity about the world around them and develops preferences.

Order out of Chaos

Babies come into a world of seeming chaos: sights, sounds, temperature, texture and more, with little in place to help them make sense of it all. They have to build the brain that will help them learn for the rest of their lives.

The task of their amazingly neuroplastic infant brains is to learn to recognize the constants that help them to derive meaning from a cacophony of stimulation that the majority of us learn to filter out – eventually.

And it is the task of the adults around them
to provide those constants.

As infants learn to recognize the simplest thing, as far as adult sensibilities are concerned, their brains grow and change their structures. As the baby’s brain learns that certain types of vibrations need to be visually interpreted, others audially, and so forth, it reorganizes its pathways for the most efficient recognition and interpretation of incoming data. It condenses the complexities of sensory awareness to comprehend “meaning.”

Assimilation of the basic concept of Mom, for example, requires a complex network of connections that, very quickly, allows the baby to understand that the source of his or her food is mother, and that she is one single element:

  • those hands are part of my mother,
  • those arms are part of my mother
  • that face is my mother smiling
  • that other face is still my mother, frowning
  • those sounds make up my mother’s voice
  • and I have a voice too

A lot of brain-based learning must take place before the baby assigns emotional or intellectual meaning to what s/he observes, eventually able to extrapolate expectations of sensory awareness to form new ideas about his or her world like, “I have a voice too.”

A LOT for our brains to learn

It makes sense that it might have seemed that brain-development is essentially a childhood task. Because young children have so much to learn so quickly, brain growth and change seems, by comparison, to stop in adulthood.

It has been postulated that, because of the size limitations of the birth canal in an upright-walking human being, our babies are born essentially nine months premature.  The increase in size of the infant’s brain after birth is phenomenal, compared to the growth in an adult brain. A baby’s brain doubles in size in their first year alone. By age three it has reached 80 percent of its adult volume.

Highways and Byways

It is a logical extrapolation that after a certain point, the brain would use what it has built in a manner similar to the way in which a city uses it’s roads to connect grocery store to neighborhood to a particular location in the center of town. There may be a hundred ways to drive from place to place, but nobody sober cuts through yards to form new roads that were never there before.

Except, with the brain, that hasn’t turned out to be exactly true.
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Good news on brain-aging from The Nun Study


Healthy Brains for a Lifetime

We really DON’T have to lose it as we age

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC
Reflections on Cognitive Impairment and Dementia Protection

Cognitive decline is NOT inevitable

A quick review before some data that will bring smiles to a lot of worried faces (especially for writers!):

There is still a lot to learn from School Sisters of Notre Dame “Nun” Study — the longitudinal scientific exploration of aging and Alzheimer’s disease originally funded by the National Institute on Aging.  Data, tissue, and genetic material collected in this landmark study will, no doubt, prove invaluable to a great many meta-studies long into the future.

Thanks to the Sisters’ unprecedented generosity of spirit, however, we now know a lot more about how the brain ages than we did, even a few years ago.  We also know more about dementia and what factors seem to be neuro-protective.

The oft-cited study centers on a group of a relatively homogeneous order of 678 Roman Catholic sisters (American, no drug use, little or no alcohol or tobacco, similar housing and reproductive histories, etc.) — which minimizes extraneous variables that may confound other similar research.

Along with, ultimately, hundreds of others in their order, a few brave nuns agreed to volunteer for a long-term study of aging and Alzheimer’s disease, hoping to provide evidence that might be used to teach the rest of us how to escape the worst ravages of this heartbreaking illness.

To repeat a comment from my last article [You don’t HAVE to lose it as you age: Moving Past Mind-Blips and “Senior Moments”]:

Upon autopsy, even some of the individuals discovered to have what used to be accepted as “positive Alzheimer’s identifiers” (senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles), managed to escape the behavioral devastation of the disease.

Others had only recently begun to exhibit signs of mental decline in the year or two before their deaths (at 80 and beyond), despite brains that would have predicted a significantly earlier onset of dementia.

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You don’t HAVE to lose it as you age


Moving Past Mind-Blips and “Senior Moments”

Maintaining & improving your brain’s vitality as you age

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC
Reflections on Cognitive Impairment and Dementia Protection

“A mind equipped with a wide range of
previously formed
pattern recognition devices
can withstand the effects of neuroerosion
for a long time.”

~ Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, PhD, from
The Wisdom Paradox 


Along with suggestions designed to help, this article begins to debunk the myth of “to be expected” age-related cognitive decline — as it explains the mechanics of memory and outlines the functional trajectory of the healthy brain as time marches on.

In the Memory Issues Series, anyone currently struggling to fit into a neurotypical mold, even if you are GenX or younger, will find a lot of information that will help you develop effective you-specific strategies to work around some of the things that give you fits and shut you down.


Our Worst Nightmare

Staying in SHAPE as we age (Source HERE)

Most people who have lived with cognitive decline in an up close and personal fashion (in particular, the ravages of any of the dementias in a loved one), frequently report a back-of-the-mind concern that they are looking into a mirror of their future selves.

Time marches on, and we’re all getting older. The first wave of Baby Boomers – that spike in the population statistics once Johnny came marching home from World War II – turned 65 in 2012.

With the third-act aging of more and more of the Boomers, this conversation will become increasingly frequent, as those back-of-the-mind concerns rise to conscious awareness and become the worries of a greater portion of our population.

Take a D-E-E-P breath — you don’t HAVE to lose it as you age!!

Prevention is the better part of valor

You wouldn’t wait until the day before the marathon to train for it, would you? Same thing with healthy brain aging! Don’t wait until decline begins to start doing something about it — if you want to experience the rosy finish you can expect if you begin to employ neuro-protective techniques NOW

Good news for most Boomers –
it’s not too late to start turning things around!

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Brain-based Symptoms Mandate Brain-based Training



ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
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“Too many people don’t care what happens
so long as it doesn’t happen to them.”
~ William Howard Taft

“Always do right; this will gratify some people
and astonish the rest.”
~ Mark Twain

Throwing down the Gauntlet:
a challenge to ADD professionals

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

Brain-based Coaches for Brain-based Symptoms

As we learned in an earlier article in this series, TBI Part I, neuropsychological impairments caused by brain injury may be characterized in terms of three functional systems, foundational in the Challenges of ADD Spectrum dysregulations as well as those of the community of those who have experienced Traumatic Brain Injuries of various sorts.

(1) intellect, which is the information-handling aspect of behavior;
(2) emotionality, which concerns feelings and motivations;  and
(3) control, which has to do with how behavior is expressed.
Source: Neuropsychological Assessment, 3nd  Ed., 1995,  by Muriel D. Lezak

Remember also that, according to the
Brain Wellness and BioFeedback Center of Washington, D.C.
there is substantial overlap in the symptoms that are diagnostic
for both MTBI* and ADD.

“Overlap” commonly includes trouble with some or all of the following: 

  • attention
  • concentration
  • distraction hypersensitivity
  • short-term memory
  • organizing
  • prioritizing
  • impulsiveness
  • multi-tasking

 — and occasionally —

  • impaired social skills, and
  • mood swings

These observations are supported by quantitative data from brain imaging studies with children and adults diagnosed with ADD/ADHD.  Single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET] scan studies show decreased metabolism in many areas of the brain that are involved in various cognitive processes including attentional, inhibitory, and decision making behaviors.

—————————————-
*MTB – “Mild Traumatic Brain Injury,”  a term that has fallen into disfavor because there is nothing mild about it’s cognitive after-effects. Research has shown that even a “mild” case of TBI can result in long-lasting neurological issues that include slowing of cognitive processes, confusion, chronic headache, post traumatic stress disorder and depression.

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Cognitive Impairment and Dementia Protection


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Maintaining Cognitive Vitality

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC

treadmill_GreenSuit“A mind equipped with a wide range of
previously formed
pattern recognition devices
can withstand the effects of neuroerosion
for a long time.”

~ Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, PhD, from
The Wisdom Paradox 

Our Worst Nightmare

How we hate the idea of losing our
hottie-bodies as we get older!

But that’s not the worst of it.

Probably the most frightening thing — for most of us old enough to truly understand that we will not live forever, anyway — is the idea that we might lose control of our MINDS as we age.

What strikes fear in our hearts is that we’ll lose the links to words, places, our fondest memories, the names of our children — the very things that define our sense of SELF.

Those who have lived with cognitive decline in an up close and personal fashion (in particular, the ravages of any of the dementias in a loved one), frequently report a back-of-the-mind concern that they are looking into a mirror of their future selves.

The first wave of Baby Boomers – that spike in the population statistics once Johnny came marching home from World War II – turned 65 last year.

Wow.

With the third-act aging of more and more of the Boomers, this conversation will become more and more frequent, as those back-of-the-mind concerns rise to conscious awareness.

Take a D-E-E-P breath — you don’t HAVE to lose it as you age!!

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Brain Science Podcast: REALLY Good Stuff!



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MORE than Brain Basics

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another article in the Brain Based Resources Series

Are you aware of Dr. Ginger Campbell‘s Brain Science Podcast? If you are not already listening, you are missing an AMAZING resource. The series itself is absolutely free, and can also be downloaded to play on another device without charge. (Donations are appreciated, for those who can swing it).

Don’t Like to Listen?

The transcript of each episode is available in pdf format for a measly dollar, for those of you who prefer to READ (or for those who want them BOTH!)

The most recent 25 episodes are FREE. Additional premium content, including episode transcripts and older episodes, is available via our Premium Subscription Plan. Individual Episodes and transcripts can be purchased in the BSP Store. – See more at: http://brainsciencepodcast.com/faq#sthash.LBZA0eOL.dpuf
The most recent 25 episodes are FREE. Additional premium content, including episode transcripts and older episodes, is available via our Premium Subscription Plan. Individual Episodes and transcripts can be purchased in the BSP Store. – See more at: http://brainsciencepodcast.com/faq#sthash.LBZA0eOL.dpuf
The most recent 25 episodes are FREE. Additional premium content, including episode transcripts and older episodes, is available via our Premium Subscription Plan. Individual Episodes and transcripts can be purchased in the BSP Store. – See more at: http://brainsciencepodcast.com/faq#sthash.LBZA0eOL.dpuf

If you prefer to listen to the interviews, it can be even easier for some of you: THERE’S AN AP FOR THAT!   

You read that correctly – you can EVEN listen on your smart phone. If you want to stream to your cell, the ap is available for an extremely reasonable charge.

In her own words:

On the Brain Science Podcast we explore how recent scientific discoveries are unraveling age-old mysteries, such as intelligence, emotions, personality, and memory. We also look at why the brain is much more complex than any computer yet devised.

Since the podcast launched, I have had the opportunity to interview quite a few leading scientists and writers and the show has been ranked #1 on iTunes™.

There are now over 70+ 96+ 107 112 127 interview episodes available, and the Brain Science Podcast has enjoyed well over 2 million downloads.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Update: 
Since January, 2014 there has been a slight change, to help Ginger offset web fees and the costs associated with pdf transcription and the production of the podcast.

  • The most recent 25 episodes are STILL free (that’s over two years of free content!)
  • Additional premium content, including access to ALL episode transcripts and older episodes, is available by enrolling in her Premium Subscription Plan.
  • For archived podcasts, individual Episodes and transcripts can be purchased at a VERY modest cost in the BSP Store.  (I happily pay $1.00 for my pdf downloads these days — they’re more than worth it!)
    BSP Store.

So let’s take a look at the kind of interviews she produces.

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This Changes Everything: Cutting Edge Brain Info


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Dr. Charles Parker Does it Again!

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another article in the Brain Based Resources Series

I promise that I’m not in Charlie Parker’s employ — we’re simply kindred spirits on the Learning to drive the very brain you were born with™ pathway, so I reference him A LOT!

So what did Parker do? He scooped me, as they say in the journalistic trade – publishing a story before this reporter could make it happen.

Usually out in front with the latest, his recent article — ADHD Insights: Glia Matters (subtitled, ADHD Evolution: Understanding the Other, Glial Brain) — includes an eighteen and a half minute video of a TED talk by PhD, Douglas Fields. Fields is the author of The Other Brain,  a book about a type of brain cell you probably haven’t heard a lot about up to now. But you WILL!

Cutting edge and right on the money where Brain-based Coaching is concerned, recent discoveries about glial cells point the way to a new frontier in cognitive neuroscience. Let’s see if I can catch you up a bit.

Neurons and Neuroglia

Science has believed for some time that the central nervous system consists of two main types of brain cells: neurons and glial cells [neuroglia]. Neuron-rich portions of the brain look greyish to our eyes because of capillary blood vessels and neuronal cell bodies — thus the brain’s nickname you have undoubtedly heard many times: “grey matter.

Since the heaviest neuron concentration is located in the cortex (that extremely shallow, wrinkly outer covering that was the last to develop in the human brain), many people expect to hear that brain cells are generally grey in color.  Nope!

Neurons – the building blocks of our “grey” matter – make up only about 15% of the cells that contribute to the structure of our brains.  As we move deeper into the brain, rich in neuroglia, white matter dominates (which actually, until it is preserved in formaldehyde, looks a pinkish white to our eyes.)

Athough glial cells dramatically outnumber neurons, it has long been thought that the two most referenced types of neurogia were primarily “support” structures. Their primary function, so we thought, was to protect the rest of the brain cells by adding structure (oligodendrocytes) and taking away waste products (astrocytes, or astroglia). Processing and cognition has long been associated with grey matter alone.

Recent research indicates that the brain cells making up our brains white matter (including their microglia buddies) have a whole lot more to do with a number of functions than was previously suspected.

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Brain-Based Coaching Basics: watch videos, change your brain


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Parts of the Brain and What They Do

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another article in the Brain-Based Resources Series

from wikimedia.org, Creative Commons

“Hardwired” — out of the box — that’s what we’ve always believed, and with a uniformity of structure and function that neuro-surgeons count on.

But brain surgeons have always known
that’s not all there is to the story.

Did you know that, as far as we know right now, the brain itself has no pain receptors?

At least, once a a surgeon gets through what we usually refer to as “the skull,” the brain itself does not need to be anesthetized.  The patient feels no pain.

That’s a good thing, too, because the surgeon may need the patient to be wide awake for the surgery.

Why?

The surgeon knows better than almost anyone that, because no two brains are exactly alike, patient feedback may well be necessary to make sure that areas needed for vital functions don’t get damaged in the process.

They really can’t take much of anything for granted when they are operating on an individual brain. Not only are we all BORN with brains that are uniquely our own, as we grow and learn and experience day-to-day events, our brains change.  Literally — structurally.

Our brains are as unique as our fingerprints: like snowflakes, no two alike!

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Booklist from the original ADD Coach Training



ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
Blog expanded Speaker Content
Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4d


“It takes a village to educate a world.
~  Madelyn Griffith-Haynie

“If the shoe doesn’t fit, don’t blame the FOOT!”
~  Madelyn Griffith-Haynie (the motto of OFI’s ADD Coach Training)

Required Reading
for OFI ‘s ADD Coach Training

The following were the Required Books for the original ADD Coach Training I delivered through my first company, The Optimal Functional Institute™ [OFI]

I chose these books initially because they contained information that I intended to refer to throughout the  Coach Training modules that made up the certification-compliant, ADD-specific coach training that I began in beta way back in 1994  —  the training that started a field.

To keep my student’s initial investment low, I chose the following books as ones I would refer to often because they were (and are) approachable, written in simple language, with great lists and descriptions of what these new ADD coaches would encounter with attentionally challenged clients.

Specific sections of these books were  required as background information for class discussions, in addition to the module content that I developed.

I required the following books specifically because they had already languaged beautifully many of the elements that I felt it important to point out in specific areas of their training.

Two of the original choices, Susan Setley’s Taming the Dragons and
Thom Hartman’s Focus Your Energy, subsequently went out of print,
but if you can find them used, nab them!

As time marched on, other excellent books became part of the bibliography that those enrolled received with their course materials.

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Attentional Spectrum Books


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ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
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Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4c


“It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
Albert Einstein

“We spend our life until we’re twenty
deciding what parts of ourselves to put in the bag,
and we spend the rest of our lives trying to get them out again.” 

~  Robert Bly

The Attentional Spectrum through The ADD Lens™

As I compiled this list of “ADD-related” books, I became crystal clear that my concept of “related” is that the book sheds some positive-minded light on the process of attentional regulation.

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Brain-Based Blogs & Websites



ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
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Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4b

 “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”
~ Alan Kay

“I worry that our lives are like soap operas.
We can go on for months and not tune in to them,
then six months later we look in and the same stuff is still going on.”
 ~ Jane Wagner — The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe
(
Lily Tomlin‘s one-woman show)

Tuning in to our future AS it is invented

AS I INDICATED on The Brain-based BOOK list, I have been distracted from compiling EACH of the Brain-based Resouce Lists so many times, that looking for all of their pieces has become an Easter Egg hunt!

So here’s a great start, with my apologies to all of the wonderful brain-based blogs and websites that didn’t make it to THIS version.

Even though “quick” changes are possible after post, I have a VERY full plate, so even a teensy-tiny edit or addition could take longer than you’d like – please don’t personalize.

Try to remember that, as The ADD Poster Girl, make-wrong shuts me down too, and admin is NOT my thing!  We all have to be willing to take a few dropped admin balls as par for my course. (HOWEVER, if you would like to gift me a full-time admin-assist, let’s talk!)

The way it stands NOW, as far as I’m concerned I deserve gold stars for staying tracked to get this done in any manner what-so-ever! 

Parodying an oft-quoted sentiment:

Nobody ever said, when they were about to die,
“DARN, I wish I’d made more time for administrative detail!” 

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Brain-Based Books



ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
Blog expanded Speaker Content
Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4a
Last Edited: March 29, 2012

“…some things you get taught.
And some things you just learn.”
~ Anna Quindlen

“Only a group of people who share a body of knowledge and
continually learn together can stay vital and viable.”

Max DePree (author of The Art of Management)

Feed
Your Mind

Many of you know that I am a voracious reader.

Reading scratches an itch in my brain. It’s time-off for good behavior. It centers me like nothing else.

Relatively rare in the ADD community, I’ve loved to read since I first learned how — took to it like a duck to water, as they say.

My Love Affair with WORDS

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Lessons from the TBI Community


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ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
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Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 3a

Intractable Ignorance:
forming an opinion without knowing very much about a subject
while refusing to investigate any information
that might change one’s mind;
closed mindedness;
cognitive inflexibility.

Feed Your Head

I will always stare in mouth-open amazement whenever I hear statements that might as well be saying, “I don’t believe that ADD is a legitimate disorder”  from intelligent and otherwise well-informed individuals.

  • Part of the the lack of acceptance and understanding is certainly the fact that ADD/EFD is what we call an invisible disorder — unlike many physical disabilities, for example.
  • Behaviors are visible, of course, but far too many people labor under the illusion that all “[mis]behavior”  is ALWAYS within the volitional control of the person exhibiting the behavior — despite a great deal of research and a great many books from credible sources pointing out the fallacy
    of that assumption.

The far greater problem, however, is ignorance – insufficient information.

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BRAIN-BASED OVERVIEW


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ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
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Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 2

Neurons that wire together fire together;
Neurons that fire together WIRE together 

We now know that the brain’s neural network respond to stimuli in a self-organizing pattern – beginning with our very first experience with a novel stimulus.

Cause and Effect Linkage

Which neurons “wire” together depends on whether the stimulus is congruent with brain expectations, whether it is reminiscent of another pattern of stimuli, and what happened NEXT.

Some self-help books refer to this neural patterning as “recording new tapes,”
furthering that analogy with terms like “playing old tapes”
— as they encourage us not to.

In actuality, we have no choice: the human brain automatically “searches its database” faster than we can exert any conscience influence over it in the moment!  It’s designed that way to safeguard the survival of our species.

We can, however, make a few tweaks to the system after the fact.

That’s the exciting implication of what we now understand about the brain’s neuroplasticity – the fact that it can CHANGE creates the opportunity for ADD Coaches to make a positive difference in the lives of our clients.

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Making the Connection: Brain-based Coaching Intro



ACO Conference Binder 2012

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, MCC, SCAC
Blog augmented
Speaker Content – Part I

Making the Connection:
Brain-based Coaching

White cake with white icing (and a cherry on top!)ADD Coaching is much MORE than ADD Icing on a vanilla cake:
It’s ADD-specific through and through!

Series Description:

EVEN if you understand the impact of an ADDer’s unreliable Prefrontal Cortex, do you know how to tweak your coaching to reflect what you know?

How do the brain’s OTHER areas relate to ADD challenges — and how we need to massage our technique so our clients are able to change can’t into can?

In the articles of this series (blog-edited “reprints” of my speaker’s content published in the ACO 2012 Conference Binder), you will learn what’s going on and what it means – in plain English – and take a new look at  ADD Coaching competencies in light of brain-based understanding.

Understanding this information has the potential to kick your coaching skills into outer space!

Readers of this series will:

1.  Be introduced to the regulatory responsibilities of 4-6 primary areas of the brain that are currently believed to contribute to ADD characteristics, and how the inter-relationship of those areas combine to create the ADD challenges and strengths described in the DSM (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, published by the American Psychological Association)

2.  Come to a new understanding of the “conductor” role of the Prefrontal Cortex, along with why it is not optimally effective to focus ONLY on the PFC in our attempt to understand or coach ADD challenges.

3.  Begin to develop a set of competency-linked skills specifically tailored to compensate for the differences in the ADD brain-style, allowing you to begin to come to a brain-based understanding of how, where and why ADD Coaching and vanilla coaching differ.
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“Vanilla” coaching,  unflavored by techniques tailored for those with Attentional Spectrum differences, is the established coaching technique used by coaches who are not trained to work with ADD; older technology designed to be effective with the neurotypical brain-style,

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