When Memory Fails – Part 2


Memory Issues
& Alphabet Disorders
(ADD/HD-EFD-TBI etc.)

©Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, MCC, SCAC
When Memory Fails, Part 2

BlankMemory

According to Psychology Today  –

Memory makes us. If we couldn’t recall the who’s, what’s, where’s, and when’s of our everyday lives, we’d never be able to manage.

We mull over ideas in the present with our short-term (or working) memory, while we store past events and learned meanings in our long-term memory.

What Science Says

Memory is dynamic and malleable – and it doesn’t NEED to decay with age.

Through the miracles made possible through our brain’s ability to build new neural-networks — neuroplasticity! — most of us can expect to remain sharp and efficient, lean, mean learning machines throughout most of our lives.  We can, that is, as long as we take care of ourselves.

However, researchers are quick to point out, just as keeping our “physical apparatus” strong and flexible requires good nutrition and hygiene, remaining well-hydrated, and making sure that we get regular exercise so that our bodies can continue to serve us well . . .

Keeping our BRAINS supple has its own set of nutritional requirements and, to maintain peak performance, our brains need even more water than our bodies.

Were you aware that 80% of your brain is good ole’ H2O??
(In case you were wondering, 60% of the remaining 20% is FAT – which is only one reason why extremely low-fat diets may be great for helping you get into your skinny jeans, but they’re LOUSY for the health of your brain!)

The brain’s need for exercise is frequently summed up in the words of an old platitude: use it or lose it!

Related post: Images for Memory Practice
For some help strengthening visual memory,
check out this post on the blog of a TBI advocate

Losing it ANYWAY

cracked mind-300x300Okay, it’s certainly true that our ability to “remember” weakens if we don’t exercise our brains or take care of our bodies.

BUT EVEN for those of us who are reasonably fit, responsibly fed, well-watered life-long learners, there are times when information seems to fall through the cracks in our minds.

Ask any relatively good student if there was ever a time when, after studying vigorously for a particular exam – and even though they KNEW they “knew” the requested information – they couldn’t supply the answer to one of the questions.

Most students will answer your question affirmatively, yet they are members of the community that “uses it” most deliberately, nearly every single day.

That reality underscores an important point in the understanding of memory dynamics: it’s not enough to focus our energies on keeping our ability to store information strong and vital.  We need to understand how to be able to retrieve the information reliably for our “memory” to be of any use to us.

Getting things OUT

The process of memory storage is an extremely important part of the equation, of course — but if our brain’s librarian can’t locate what we ask it for when it comes time to USE the information, what good is it?

So before we explore the process of moving information into long-term memory storage, let’s take a look at the ways in which our “neuro-librarians” deliver what we’re looking for once it is stored there.

The “regurgitation” portion of the memory process is a factor of, essentially, three different processes:

  • recognition
  • recall, and
  • recall on demand

Let’s distinguish each of them before we go any further.

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Everything you ever wanted to know about SLEEP


BrainTransplantHeader

Another of Martin's wonderful educational drawings, of a man in bed, distracted from sleeping by a stream of light

Phillip Martin, artist/educator

EVERYTHING?

Well, everything I’ve already published on SLEEP here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com, anyway
and that’s quite a lot
(all linked below – scroll DOWN for list)

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Top Ten Reasons to Reframe Procrastination


From the Brain-Transplant Series

ADD Information you NEED to know!

from THE ADD Poster Girl: Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, MCC, SCAC
Founder of the ADD Coach Training Field; Cofounder of the ADD Coaching field

WHY reframe Procrastination?

© Phillip Martin – artist/educator

  1. First & foremost, Procrastination has become a LABEL.
  2. Labeling is an unfortunate form of self-activated, actively defended confirmation bias.
  3. Confirmation bias limits the search for solutions – you can’t find what you don’t look for
  4. Labeling is judgmental – judgment is make-wrong. Make-wrong never works.
  5. Make-wrong is mean.  It hurts our feelings and shuts us down.
  6. Make-wrong makes us defensive, which activates the amygdala. Bad idea!
  7. Amygdala hijack pulls resources from the PFC (prefrontal cortex). Really bad idea!
  8. We need the PFC on-board for activation and accomplishment.
    Kinda’ dumb to shut it down, huh?
  9. People have been writing “tough love” and “just DO it” advice trying to end the procrastination problem seemingly forever — yet tons of folks still do it.
    It’s beyond crazy to keep doing the same thing, expecting a different result!!
  10. Time to try a new way ’round, don’cha think?

The collection of article links below will help you change things in your LIFE

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TBI Recovery – like life on the high seas


I KNOW – I said I didn’t like WordPress’s “reblog” function – and I don’t (even though it’s marginally better than it was) – but it’s mostly lousy with graphics, formatting (and the fact that they stick my “introduction” at the BOTTOM of the post excerpt – truly dumb, right?).

Since BrokenBilliant’s article is mostly words I thought I’d give it a shot anyway.

Because it is so GOOD – so hopefully realistic about how an atypical brain (ADD-TBI-EFD-BPII- whatever!) is like sailing the high seas — you just can’t walk around on deck the same way you might on land.

Read it in his own words –  jump over to his site and read it with intentional formatting – but FIRST, check out the comment below — v-e-r-y interesting!

xx,
mgh

Broken Brain - Brilliant Mind

I’ve heard it said that it takes about seven years of recovery for a person to start feeling “like themself” again after traumatic brain injury. That sounds about right to me. And now that I’ve been at it (actively) since 2007, I’m coming up on seven years — next year.

What a long, strange trip it’s been. From nearly losing everything, to sabotaging job after job, to watching my friends go away, to the relationship/marriage troubles and health issues, to slowly building myself back… it has been a trip. But it’s finally starting to feel like things are stabilizing for me.

When I say “things” I mean internal things. Not external things. Learning to live with TBI is like going to sea and learning to walk across the deck of a ship that’s rolling through all sorts of seas. Between the sensory issues, the focusing issues, the distraction problems, the…

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Variations on ADD-ADHD


 Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

From the Brain-Transplant Series

ADD Information you NEED to know!
from THE ADD Poster Girl: Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, MCC, SCAC 

 to grok the concept of these posts, click:
ABOUT The Brain-Transplant Series
(where you will find links to other posts in the Brain-Transplant Series)

Whad’ya mean“Variations?”

FreeVector-Octopus-Doodle

GOOD question!

Here are just a few of the answers:

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Booklist from the original ADD Coach Training



ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
Blog expanded Speaker Content
Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4d


“It takes a village to educate a world.
~  Madelyn Griffith-Haynie

“If the shoe doesn’t fit, don’t blame the FOOT!”
~  Madelyn Griffith-Haynie (the motto of OFI’s ADD Coach Training)

Required Reading
for OFI ‘s ADD Coach Training

The following were the Required Books for the original ADD Coach Training I delivered through my first company, The Optimal Functional Institute™ [OFI]

I chose these books initially because they contained information that I intended to refer to throughout the  Coach Training modules that made up the certification-compliant, ADD-specific coach training that I began in beta way back in 1994  —  the training that started a field.

To keep my student’s initial investment low, I chose the following books as ones I would refer to often because they were (and are) approachable, written in simple language, with great lists and descriptions of what these new ADD coaches would encounter with attentionally challenged clients.

Specific sections of these books were  required as background information for class discussions, in addition to the module content that I developed.

I required the following books specifically because they had already languaged beautifully many of the elements that I felt it important to point out in specific areas of their training.

Two of the original choices, Susan Setley’s Taming the Dragons and
Thom Hartman’s Focus Your Energy, subsequently went out of print,
but if you can find them used, nab them!

As time marched on, other excellent books became part of the bibliography that those enrolled received with their course materials.

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Attentional Spectrum Books


 Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.


ACO Conference Binder 2012 –
Blog expanded Speaker Content
Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – Part 4c


“It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
Albert Einstein

“We spend our life until we’re twenty
deciding what parts of ourselves to put in the bag,
and we spend the rest of our lives trying to get them out again.” 

~  Robert Bly

The Attentional Spectrum through The ADD Lens™

As I compiled this list of “ADD-related” books, I became crystal clear that my concept of “related” is that the book sheds some positive-minded light on the process of attentional regulation.

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When you are NEW to ADD


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

From the Brain-Transplant Series

ADD Information you NEED to know!
from THE ADD Poster Girl: Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, MCC, SCAC

to grok the concept of these posts, CLICK:
ABOUT The Brain-Transplant Series
(where you will find links to other posts in the Brain-Transplant Series)

Whad’ya mean NEW to ADD?

GOOD question!

Here are some possible answers:

  • Diagnosed [dx’d] in the last three months
  • Dx’d in the last YEAR, but still struggling and don’t really understand WHY
  • Dx’d EVER, but suspect you are still “under-functioning” and don’t know what else to do
  • Your CHILD fits in either of the three categories above
  • You SUSPECT ADD – in yourself or a loved one – and are wondering if you need to explore diagnosis – no matter HOW you feel about the meds issue

NEW means new to ANY of “The ADD Basics” — no matter WHO you are or how long you’ve been working with ADD in any fashion (even as a professional, by the way).

  • I’ll bet you a year of free coaching that, even if you THINK you know
    ADD fairly well already, what you don’t know still will surprise you —
    and could change your life.
  • Some day I hope to have time to add a few quizzes, but for now . . .
    what’s the harm in checking out the articles below, just to see if you
    already know everything you think you’ll find there?
  • They will be a great review, if nothing else!

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