The World’s only Dog who’s a real-live PIG


Spotlight STAR-dom!
Thanks to the world’s only dog/pig
Guest blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

Let’s hear it for Bacon!

TinkerToy here again, reminding you that nobody really calls me that but my mom.  My friends call me Tink.  And I want to tell you about one of them – Bacon. (Yes – that Bacon – the one who writes the Dear Bacon advice column, not to name drop.)

Well, I just found out he’s also a producer!
And he’s gonna’ make me a star too!

He has this interview show online called SpotLight Thursday, and he just asked me to be in it.  Just like that.  Right out of the blue.

And guess what else?  It’s gonna’ be ALL about me – sorta’ like that Actor’s Studio interview show Mom loves where all kinds of stars answer questions about their lives, only it’s online – on a blog.

So, of course, I want to tell you all about HIM!

Way back before I dubbed him an official member of The Canine Club, Bacon was born a miniature pot bellied pig.

His parents adopted him when he was only three weeks old – and he’s been one of my blog buddies since my debut guest-post, Blogging Tips from a Shih Tzu.

He has his own quarters at the Hotel Thompson — and he blogs and journals and otherwise tells all about practically everything and everyone in his life, including his adopted blogging brother Houdini (who’s a dog-dog like me), his forever Mom and Dad (who tells the world’s corniest jokes, but don’t hurt his feelings), his purr sibling Hemi, and a whole kennel’s worth of pet rocks.

The pet rock invasion began when one of them, Bashful, began traveling. He suddenly started to make a whole lot of friends who really liked to be around him.  They sorta’ followed him back to Hotel Thompson for his visits home and just decided, one by one, that they would stay. So now they’re all part of the family.

They also have their very own reporter – Journalist Rocky the Squirrel (Keeping [his] paws on the nuts of the world!”)

(Read all about all of them – and see their pictures – HERE)

Read more of this post

TinkerToy’s FIRST Meet and Greet for 4-legses


Inspired by the ones hosted by 2-legses
(but we 4-legged bloggers have a lot to say too!)

Guest blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

It’s never too late to party with us! 
Comments never close here – so leave your calling card.

CALLING ALL DOGS
cats, squirrels, pigs, hamsters, rabbits, rats, turtles, even parrots and budgies

We can do it too

If you’ve been over to PuppyDoc’s blog, you already know she’s not a real dog.

Her actual name is Phoebe and she’s a 2-legs who is also a super doctor with a HUGE heart — but who can blame her for adopting a great nickname like that, huh? (She explains why on her own blog, so jump over there if you want to know the back-story.)

Anyway, she hosted this big Meet-and-Greet Party where some of my pals and I left links to our blogs. I guess it was a great party for Mom, but not so much for me.

No offense, PuppyDoc, but I had to scroll through screen-loads of links to 2-legs’es blogs to find the ones written by possible blogging buds for ME.

So I thought I’d throw a party of my own to see if I could host a spot where us 4-legses stand out because we’re the only ones there (no offense to you blogging birds, btw – you are more than welcome too).

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The REAL Christmas Elves


Santa couldn’t do it without us!
Proof that we can do more than cuddle or blog

Guest blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

My FIRST Christmas post (and my first sort-of reblog)

Mom found this video and said I could use it in my first Christmas post.  It was originally posted by Xena on her Black Butterfly blog with the following introduction:

I never get enough of this video. It’s produced by Fresh Pets.

The music is festive, but really loud,
so you might want to lower the volume on your speakers
before you click on the little triangle thing in the middle.

Source: Santa’s Canines (and Felines) Make Toys | We Hold These Truths To Be Self-Evident

Read more of this post

Sleeping with the Enemy: Mom’s N-24


How N-24 affects the rest of us
With a special take on the topic from Guest Blogger TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
from the Comorbidities and Sleep & Sleep Disorders Series

“When you hear hoof-beats,
think horses not Zebras”

Most doctors are repeatedly exposed to that little ditty from their earliest days in Med School, encouraging them to always consider the simplest explanations first.

It’s not bad advice for many of the disorders and diseases they’ll come across in the patients who will walk through their office doors seeking diagnosis and treatment.

It just turns out to be exactly wrong when it comes to recognizing chronorhythm disorders – disorders of sleep TIMING.

November 24th is N24 Awareness Day

As explained in last weeks post, N-24 Awareness Day is almost upon us:

N24 Awareness Day was first organized in 2012 to help raise awareness of chronorhythm disorders – those affecting sleep TIMING – and particularly to increase awareness of one of its lesser known manifestations: Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Syndrome.

It is also known as hypernychthemeral syndrome, N24, N-24, or free-running sleep disorder.

It is a severe, chronic and disabling neurological disorder that causes an individual’s “brain clock” to be unable to stay in sync with “nature’s clock,” the 24-hour cycle of light and dark on our planet.

For many years it was believed to be rarer than those of us who live with it know it to be, and to affect only the blind – supposedly the only individuals unable to “rephase to light.” SIGHTED sufferers were excluded from the studies, and are still today.

How can medical science expect to find what they fail to seek?

N24 Awareness Day – or N24 Day – is now observed annually, gathering participants as increasingly more people become aware of sleep timing disorders, recognizing their own sleep-struggles when they read about the symptoms.

Many have been MIS-diagnosed with insomnia, narcolepsy, or “simple” sleep apnea, because MOST doctors, therapists and coaches remain shamefully unaware — unable to recognize clear symptoms of an entire class of sleep disorders: those that are the result of chronorhythm dysregulation.

Read more of this post

THIS will REALLY Scare you!


Who Needs Ghost Stories?!
Guest blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

Scary things done to dogs

TinkerToy here, reminding you not judge me for that. (Remember, I didn’t get much of a vote, and Killer wasn’t on the menu.)

That’s NOT me over there, by the way. It’s one of the scary things — done to a dog that looks a lot like me.

Mom wasn’t planning to let me at the computer for a few more weeks. BUT, since my first ever post, Blogging Tips from a Shih Tzu got more comments than any of hers, she couldn’t exactly say no.

This is my second ever blog post — and it’s about the scariest thing about Halloween.

NOT what you think!

I’ll bet you were thinking I was going to blog about the hateful two-legs who abandon dogs, the horrors of puppy mills, or dog-abuse.

While those are ALL very scary things indeed, my Halloween post is going to focus on what the two-legs do to us on this one particular day each year — just because they think it’s funny, and just because they can.

Yep – costumes.

Even before I was born, Mom had a Pinterest Board called Deck the Dog where she pinned all sorts of pictures of puppies and dogs dressed in all manner of outfits. She said it made her laugh. (Weird sense of humor, this two-leg I live with.)

THEN, shortly after she heard about the Halloween Costume Party at my Cheers bar down the street, I caught her looking for “ideas” – and none of them looked like pictures of anything she’s thinking about for her.

Read more of this post

Suicidal Kids linked to ADD/ADHD more than Depression


New Study on a “hidden” problem
Kids who kill themselves

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

an edited reblog for ADD Awareness Month
from Devon Frye, September 20, 2016

Looking at the overlooked

Children under the age of 12 are often overlooked in conversations about suicide and suicide prevention. The sobering reality is that a small number of U.S. children between the ages of 5 and 11 kill themselves every single year.

A new study finds that ADHD* — not depression — is the most common diagnosis for children who commit suicide between the ages of 5 and 11.

The study adds another dimension to the story of suicide’s youngest victims: more of them lived with ADHD* than any other mental health diagnosis — even depression.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
* The original article uses “ADHD” — even though I avoid that “H”
unless I am quoting others or directly referring to gross motor hyperactivity
only one symptom in a profile that is only sometimes part of an ADD diagnosis.

About the Study

The study, published September 19th in the journal Pediatrics, looked at 87 children between the ages of 5 and 11 who took their own lives between 2003 and 2012.

They were compared with 606 adolescents, between the ages of 12 and 17, who committed suicide in the same period.

Data was drawn from the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), a U.S. database that collects information from coroners, police officers, and death certificates to track violent deaths.

All the children hailed from one of 17 states that participate in the NVDRS and allow outside researchers to access the data. Approximately one-third of the children overall had a documented mental health diagnosis.

Age seems to matter

In adolescence, children who committed suicide were most likely to be suffering from depression — nearly two-thirds of teens who took their own lives showed depressive symptoms before their deaths.

But in children under the age of 12, depression only showed up in a third of the children. An overwhelming majority — more than 60 percent — had ADHD (primarily hyperactive type).

CDC Statistics & Strategies

Read more of this post

Blogging Tips from a Shih Tzu


You can learn a lot about community from a puppy
Guest blogger: TinkerToy

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

My ten and a half pound fur-baby just turned two. It seems like only yesterday I wrote the post about going to get him when he was just a teeny-tiny.

Like most teens (in dog years), he is obsessed with staying in touch with his pack – and he has some great ideas about blogging. I’ll let him tell you in his own words.


Happy Birthday to me!

TinkerToy here.  Don’t judge me for that. I didn’t get much of a vote, and Killer wasn’t on the menu.

I was born on October 8th, two years ago. I’ve been watching Mom blog for all that time — watching and waiting, trying to be good.

She said that if I let her work and didn’t distract her, I could try it myself when I was two.

This is my very first blog post — and it’s about blogging.

Dogs do it better

Modern dogs spend a lot of time indoors, you know. You two-legs don’t give us a lot of time to interact, so we’ve had to work out another way to connect.

Read more of this post

Balance Balls for On-Task Classroom Focus?


Does sitting on a balance ball help children with ADHD in the classroom?

Guestpost from David Rabiner, Ph.D.
Dept. of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University
©
ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE; September 21, 2016

Let’s NOT discount the science

Could sitting on a balance ball help children with ADD/ADHD/EFD be more focused and on-task in the classroom?

While the idea may strike many as implausible, several small but interesting studies conducted since 2003 suggests there may be something to this.

Really?

Dr. Rabiner recently received a question from a long-time subscriber and teacher about whether there was any research to support a practice in her school of having children with ADHD sit on fidget cushions when seated on the floor or chair.

The idea behind this approach is that children with ADHD may benefit from more movement in the classroom because being in motion allows their brains to be more fully engaged.

He was not immediately aware of any research on this issue, and it initially struck him as a bit far fetched. When he searched the literature, however, he came across several small but interesting studies that yielded promising results.

Scroll DOWN for his excellent summary
of this small body of work.


Please feel free to forward this content to others you know who may be interested. If you would like to receive Attention Research Update on a regular basis, visit http://www.helpforadd.com for a no-charge subscription.

ABOUT:  I have been a huge fan of Dr. David Rabiner’s ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE since its inception in 1997. Not only do I count on his comprehensive, plain-English explanations of up-to-date research trends and developments as key resources in my drive to keep my information base current, I also archive them for future reference.

I urge any professional working with individuals with Attentional Spectrum deficits and struggles — whether teachers, counselors, coaches, therapists or physicans — to sign yourself up before the idea falls through the cracks.  (Parents and ADD/EFDers themselves can benefit too!)

Read more of this post

Easy Expense Tracking


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

free-clipart.net

free-clipart.net

Keeping Track of Your Expenses
(even if you have ADD)

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie introduces
Guest Blogger Ros Lederman

It Takes a Village

One of the things I love about blogging is access to the blogging community. 

I really appreciate meeting new members of The Tribe and learning something from THEM — no matter which streets of Alphabet City they consider their home turf: ADD, TBI, EFD, OCD, BPII, MDD – or any other disorder or dysregulation that impacts what I call The Attentional Spectrum.

Even if the things they write about are those I sort-of already knew, it lands differently when I read it in their words.

Like feasting on a dinner prepared by someone else, it tastes better when I don’t have to cook it myself. 

I’ll bet some of you feel the same way about some of my articles here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com.

HOWEVER, the sheer SIZE of WebUniverse makes it difficult to find new voices and to stay connected.  So, from time to time, I invite a fresh voice to write something for me to share with you – since I’ll bet you’re as overwhelmed with the banquet of information as I am.

The only problem is follow-through — part and parcel of the Executive Functioning struggles we all have to wrestle down.  I have learned to think of the guest blogs like surprise gifts – I’m never sure when they are coming, but I’m always thrilled with their arrival.

SO, without much further ado, take a look at our most recent surprise gift from a blogger soon to have a Masters Degree in writing, whose most impressive credential is that she is ALSO a member of Team ADD.

Take the time to check out her blogs – for a “relative newbie” to the ADD Tribe, she has been seriously focused on getting herself informed.  Take advantage of what she has learned. (Leave her feedback in the comments section to her GuestPost here to encourage her to do this AGAIN.  She has a lot to share with us.)

Read more of this post

Participating in Online Communities for Mutual Support


Digital Literacies Peacock

Why a “Digital Literacy” Introduction?

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
See UPDATE 4/27 below

I recently received an invitation from Hazel Owen, a woman introducing herself to me for the first time after her first visit to ADDandSoMuchMore.com.

She became aware of me only because I had “liked” an article written by her (hold that thought – it will relate to unwritten “reciprocity norms” when you read the upcoming article).

Hazel is an education advocate who hosts an online community from New Zealand (which explains some differences in slang and spelling you will find in articles written by her).

I found her voice, her background and her community impressive and fascinating, so I accepted her invitation to blog occasionally on her platform.

In THIS article, she is “returning the favor,” offering us some information I believe our entire community sorely needs — a beginners’ explanation of some of the “rules” of this whole “internet communities” thing! In other words, an introduction to the concept of Digital Literacy (dialogue with her in the comments section if you have questions – this lady KNOWs!)

Internet Alzheimer’s 🙂

Regular readers of ADDandSoMuchMore.com are most likely aware of my own technical challenges and frustrations. Most days I feel like a dolt who used to be on top of things.

Although I was once a computer professional myself, it was MANY years ago – decades that might as well be centuries in internet time.  The computer world moves rapidly, so practically nothing from those years offers me any help what-so-ever!!

In fact, after almost four years “off-line” as the result of some personal and health challenges, it seems now that my first instincts about how to do practically anything online are almost always wrong-wrong-wrong.

To make matters even worse, the people I asked (even paid!) for help didn’t seem to get it that I was unable to understand even their explanations, such was the depth of my cluelessness.

  • I had no IDEA how to “work” the software they suggested I download
    to “help.”
  • Other than “scroll” and a few other basic words that meant exactly
    what they used to mean, I was almost totally unfamiliar with the
    vocabulary they employed as they endeavored to enlighten me.
    Sheesh!

Oh goodie, more “in-order-to’s” to master .  .  . must I now give up bathing
and sleeping to fit it all in?

Hazel to the Rescue!

Hazel Owen
It turns out, you don’t NEED to be a technical guru to participate in the developing trend toward global connection.

There are a few basics you do need to know to keep from stepping in – um – trouble by violating the social expectations of the rest of Planet Internet.

After that, however, you can develop your “online literacy” at a pace most of us over here on Planet ADD will be able to manage without giving up basic self-care.

And now, without further ado, H-E-R-E-‘ s Hazel!

Read more of this post

ABOUT Rainbow Brains


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

Exploring Neurodiversity

Guestpost from Heather McCrae
Neurodiversity Coach and Blogger

Intro by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CMC, MCC, SCAC

If you’ve been following this blog for very long you are surely well aware that  I strongly believe that pathologizing any difference, disorder or disability is a crying shame.  

You also realize, no doubt, that I am ALSO reluctant to jump on the “it’s a difference, not a disability”  bandwagon.

The Power of Diagnostic Identification

In my 25 years in the coaching/training field, primarily working with (and training other coaches to work with) individuals with non-neurotypical brains (aka. “vanillas” – unflavored by the “mix-ins” we find in ADD and/or any of the other spectrum disorders), I have seen the power of an accurate diagnosis to finally turn a life of struggle into one of freedom with accomplishment – time and time again.

Read more of this post

Feel Good Video – Well Deserved


by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Part of the What Kind of World do YOU Want? Series

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens
can change the world.
Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

~ Margaret Mead

Phillip Martin – artist, educator, advocate

Martin is the heartwarmingly generous and world-changing artist and educator who created (and has allowed me to use) the adorable graphics that accompany the majority of my posts here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com.

Changing the World, One Wall at a Time

He ALSO travels the world to stimulate cities, towns and villages to work and play together on a project  that inspires positive community involvement as a tool for change.

He does this by creating highly visible artwork with their children — painting murals on the walls of their schools, abandoned buildings, and other places where art can make a difference (at his own expense).

Don’t you love it when the GOOD guys get the press?

Read more of this post

New Study: CBT Looks Promising for ADD Teens


New Study shows Teens w/ ADHD helped by
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Guestpost from David Rabiner, Ph.D.
Associate Research Professor;
Dept. of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University
ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE
August 2012

=====================================================================================
I have been a huge fan of Dr. David Rabiner’s ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE since its inception in 1997. Not only do I count on his comprehensive, plain-English explanations of up-to-date research trends and developments as key resources in my drive to keep my information base current,  I also archive them for future reference.  

For those who aren’t already among the over 40,000 people currently subscribed (sponsored now by CogMed, so no longer a charge to you), at the conclusion of this post I tell you how to get your own monthly copy in your very own email box.

I urge any professional working with individuals on the Attentional Spectrum — whether teachers, counselors, coaches, therapists or physicans — to sign yourself up the second you see those instructions, before it falls through the cracks.  (Parents and ADDers themselves can benefit too!)

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC

Read more of this post

Processing slower or more to think about?


How FAST can you sift & sort?

Intro by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Part THREE of the Brain-Based Processing Series

How fast can you FILTER? 

THAT is the question.

CLICK HERE for Part I: ABOUT Processing Speed
CLICK HERE for Part II: Processing Efficiency

Introduction

EFD: TBI & ADD (and more!)

There are a great many disabilities that are manifestations of Exectutive Functioning Disorder [EFD] – some inborn, and some acquired subsequently.

Some EF struggles are a consequence of damage to the frontal cortex, others are a consequence of another disease or disorder and its impact on hormones or glucose metabolism — or anything that has an effect on the neurotransmitter balance in the Prefrontal Cortex [PFC].

Read more of this post

Processing Efficiency is all about Juggling


Measuring Processing Fluency?

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Part TWO of the Brain-Based Processing Series

*attribution below

How fast can YOU juggle?

Science is rapidly approaching the level of urgency in its attempt to understand the dynamics of cognition that those of us with processing disorders have lived with 24/7 for some or all of our lives.

Almost everyone in the industrialized world reports being “stressed to the max,” which seems, as many are beginning to point out, to have some connection with productivity effectiveness.

Glory hallelujah!

Since the consequences of chronic stress have come to public awareness, personally affecting almost every individual in industrialized societies, corporate heads and productivity gurus have been searching unsuccessfully for ways to lower stress levels without abandoning their preoccupation with capital and profitability.

  • Only a very small subgroup has connected chronic stress to
    human processing limitations.
  • Only a few of those individual have any idea what might work
    to extend the capacities and work around the limitations
    of the human brain.

So, of course, NOW is a good time to apply for funding for cognition studies.  We’ll hear about more and more of them in the next few years. Read more of this post

ADD Positively Top Ten reblogged


Madelyn Griffith-Haynie says:

I am trying the “reblog” feature for the first time — this is a “Top Ten” you will love – from the ADDPositely blog. (We’ll find out how “reblog” works together.)

In typical ADD fashion, Top “ten” became 33 – complete with the great graphics shown above (not a lot of words, so a quick and funny read).

Enjoy this post – and check out her blog. It’s great!

— xx, mgh

PS. UGH!  IMHO, WordPress “reblog” is a REALLY inflexible (and totally ADD-unfriendly) “feature”  — especially the way it handles graphics! Tried it – HATE IT!

SO sorry!  I’ll figure out some other way if I want to share someone else’s post again. (MEANWHILE, click the “Related Content from around the ‘net” at the bottom of the posts I write for you).

Related Articles on ADDandSoMuchMore.com

Check this out too!

addpositively

TOP Ten Manifestations of Adult ADHD

  1. Disorganized
  2. Reckless Driving/Traffic Accidents

     

  3. Marital/Relationship Problems
  4. Extreme Distractibility
  5. Poor Listening Skills
  6. Restlessness, Problems Relaxing
  7. Procrastination, Problems starting a Task
  8. Chronic Lateness

     

  9. Angry outbursts (living on Anger Street)

     

  10. Prioritizing Issues                                                                                                         and then there are more:
  1. Losing track of thoughts/ideas in the middle of tasks
  2. Missing details or making careless mistakes
  3. Inability to complete assignments work/school
  4. Forgetfulness
  5. Difficulty following instructions
  6. Restless, constantly shifting in chair, tapping feet or pencil playing or tugging at hair or clothing and unable to stop.
  7. Impulsive, childish i.e. Can’t stand waiting in line, constant interrupting, blurt…

View original post 267 more words

Winner: Top 20 ADHD Blog Award 2012


Congrats to all my Blogging Colleagues!

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

How cool is THIS?

Bryan Hutchinson, bestselling ADD author (including One Boy’s Struggle as well as one of the most downloaded ADD eBooks in history), and founder of the ADD playground that I like to call “the ADD Facebook” just announced the winners of the 2012 Top 20 ADHD Blog Award.

ADDandSoMuchMore.com made the list!

So did nineteen other excellent ADD Blogs (and one “up-and-coming”)
— representing some of the hardest working bloggers on the ‘net.

Read more of this post

Is Your Child on the TEAM?


TEAMS: A New ADHD Treatment for Preschoolers

Guestpost from David Rabiner, Ph.D.
Associate Research ProfessorDept. of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University
ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE – April 2012

=====================================================================================
I have been a huge fan of Dr. David Rabiner’s ATTENTION RESEARCH UPDATE since its inception in 1997. Not only do I count on his comprehensive, plain-English explanations of up-to-date research trends and developments as key resources in my drive to keep my information base current,  I also archive them for future reference.  

For those who aren’t already among the over 40,000 people currently subscribed (sponsored now by CogMed, so no longer a charge to you), at the conclusion of this post I tell you how to get your own monthly copy in your very own email box.

I urge any professional working with individuals on the Attentional Spectrum — whether teachers, counselors, coaches, therapists or physicans — to sign yourself up the second you see those instructions, before it falls through the cracks.  (Parents and ADDers themselves can benefit too!)

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, A.C.T, MCC, SCAC
=====================================================================================

TEAM Training

In this month’s issue of Attention Research Update I review a recently published study that examined a new intervention for preschool children with ADHD called TEAMSTraining Executive, Attention, and Motor Skills.

The premise of this interesting and important study is that through regular parent-child engagement in games designed to exercise important neurocognitive skills, it may be possible to affect enduring reductions in core ADHD symptoms.

Thus, in contrast to current evidence-based interventions like medication treatment and behavior therapy, the goal of TEAMS is to produce more fundamental and enduring change.

I think this is very important work for the field and I believe you will find this to be an interesting study.

Sincerely,
David Rabiner, Ph.D.; Associate Research Professor
Dept. of Psychology & Neuroscience; Duke University; Durham, NC 27708

———————————————————————————————————
mgh note:
 Although this post is longer than usual, I chose to present the entire April issue instead of writing a summary, in answer to the many requests I have received for more information about non-pharmaceutal treatment alternatives.

Read more of this post

Coaching Tips For Parents Of LD & ADD/HD Children


Artwork courtesy of Phillip Martin

Playing on the SAME Team
Guest blogger: Dr. Steven Richfield

A parent writes:
Both our son and daughter struggle with learning disabilities and Attention Deficit Disorder.

As they struggle so do my husband and I. Communication breaks down into arguments, problems arise in school and among peers, and we are often unsure of how to handle their emotional ups and downs. Any suggestions?

Children with LD and ADD/ADHD present unique challenges and rewards to parents. The vulnerability of a fragile ego, the unthinking behaviors rooted in impulsivity, or the steep decline of emotional meltdowns, can render even the most patient parent looking for tools and techniques to manage their child’s unpredictable behaviors.

These scenarios fall under the heading of what I have come to call the “Now, what do I do?” syndrome. It is a question echoing through the minds of all parents at one time or another.

As a child psychologist who trains parents who regularly witness these scenarios, I help empower parents with tools and tips to manage the emotional and social currents of ADHD and LD children.

Here are some to consider:

Read more of this post

Who’s Martin?


 

Noooo . . . not “Martin” —
Phillip Martin!

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

I’ve been getting more than a few “Who’s Martin?” questions and it finally dawned on me who everybody was asking about.

He is the heartwarmingly generous and world-changing artist and educator who created (and has allowed me to use) the adorable graphics that accompany the majority of my posts here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com.

Since there’s a link to his website on the sidebar of every post on this blog (scroll down to the links on that skinny column to your right), I don’t always caption his artwork — especially since his copyright is already incorporated into the graphic.

Oops! – sometimes sizing makes it tough to read “Phillip” clearly —
thus the repeated “Who’s Martin” questions.  Now you know.

Some of you will CLICK HERE to read his own version of his resume on his site.
The rest of you can read my version below (essentially his, with a few nip-tucks – permission requested and received from his FaceBook page)

IF YOU ARE AN EDUCATOR, you REALLY want to take the time to click around over there – he’s got really cool, totally free, no-strings-attached resources for you as his gift to education.  What a guy, huh?

Read more of this post

Reframing Task-Completion


ADD/ADHD and Unfinished Personal Projects
Guest blogger: Bryan Hutchinson

I have hundreds of unfinished personal projects and I have ADHD.

From what I understand about ADHD, and from what I have read, I should be upset about unfinished personal projects.

However, I am a writer and writing has taught me an extremely valuable lesson, and that is:

 •  Finishing everything I start writing is nearly impossible
and,
 •  Not everything that’s started is meant to be finished.

Sometimes what I start is meant to take me somewhere else, to get me past a hump or lead me to deeper thoughts or inspiration.

Before I go any further, let me clarify that I am talking about personal projects here. Not jobs. That’s for another post.

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ADDerWorld – Folks Like US!


 Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

Lonelinesss . . .

is a longing for kind,

not company”

~source unknown

———————————————————————————————————————– 

Come meet your TRIBE

by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

I would like to personally invite you to join one of the coolest ADD Playgrounds since the AOL ADD community  (way back in the online “olden days”) — ADDerWorld.

Membership is free. Bryan Hutchinson, the author of One Boy’s Story (and other ADD books and ebooks) uses book royalties to pay the freight.  In fact, when you join, he even lets you download a couple for absolutely nothing.

It’s like a FaceBook just for ADDers — and loved ones, colleagues, managers and educators who want to understand the ADDers they work with, teach, live with and love.

Do you have ADD yourself?

  • If you’ve ever felt like nobody in the world will ever understand – GET OVER THERE!
  • If you’re looking for a shoulder to cry on, a group to laugh with, a place where nobody’s gonna’ make you wrong – GET OVER THERE!!!
  • If you’re looking for a place where you can blog about your feelings without having to hide who you are – you know where to go, right?

Are you trying to live with an ADDer?

  • If you’ve ever felt like you will never in the world understand what’s going in in that ADD head of theirs – GET OVER THERE!
  • If you’re positive sometimes that YOUR ADDer really IS Lazy, Stupid and Crazy it’ll all start making A LOT more sense as you read the same private thought, tears and triumphs of so many other ADDers doing and saying what you thought was a behavioral quirk unique to your ADD pal  – ALL on ADDerWorld!!!

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Change Requests & SuperSensitives


Bradshaw’s Change Model and Hypersensitivity
Guest blogger: Glen Hogard

Hypersensitivity: Anything from not being able to tolerate tight clothing or labels in clothing that irritate our skin, to light, temperature, or sound sensitivity, to heightened emotional sensitivity, we often have to find ways to cut down on our reaction or “over reaction” to a stimulus.

While heightened sensitivity can be a valuable benefit in certain areas of life as in jobs such as EMS technician, doctor, fireman, and even a writer, when it is extra emotional sensitivity it can make interpersonal relationships, especially intimate relationships, difficult if not balanced with ways to sooth our hypersensitive emotions.

While it’s easy to see how it affects us, it’s not so easy to temper.

In the 1980’s, before I knew about ADD/ADHD, I was taught a tool by John Bradshaw, a famous family systems therapist, while working with his first satellite center outside of his California facility in Miami. I worked then, as I have done for ADDA, as the volunteer coordinator for his then yearly or semi-yearly seminars hosted by a great therapist Joan E. Childs.

I’m sure there are other variations of this method in practice, but this is how it was taught to me. So here it is: The Change Model

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Coaching Organizational Skills To ADD/ADHD Children


Overcoming the Biggest Roadblock to Young Success
Guest blogger: Dr. Steven Richfield

Illustration courtesy of Phillip Martin

Of all the struggles associated with ADD/ADHD, organizational problems create the greatest havoc in children’s academic lives.

Forgotten or misplaced homework assignments, lost supplies, poor long term planning, and underestimating task demands are a few of the typical traps that sabotage school performance.

The resulting stress imposed upon family relationships, coupled with the damage incurred by the child’s self-esteem, makes it vital that children learn ways to overcome the organizational chaos so typical of ADD/ADHD.

Parents wishing to coach organizational skills to their ADD/ADHD children can benefit from the following strategies.

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