Surviving Cancer – a celebration


30th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day
June 4th, 2017 — 1st Sunday in June

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

Just a quickie to honor fellow survivors

Although I recently made the decision to post only twice a week, on Mondays and Fridays, I couldn’t let today pass without some sort of announcement that might serve as encouragement to anyone still fighting.

Cancer is not always fatal.

My own 5-year clear was decades ago now.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From my June Mental Health Awareness Calendar:

30th Annual National Cancer Survivors Day
Sunday, June 4th, 2017  (First Sunday in June)
The Official Website: National Cancer Survivors Day
Improving Cancer Survivors’ Mental Health

As a melanoma survivor myself  — several decades clear now and one of America’s more than 15.5 million cancer survivors — this is indeed a day to celebrate (and pray that lives & research funding will NOT fall victim to short-sighted budget cuts)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As an American, I plan to celebrate today by writing to the policy-makers and members of the Appropriations Committee advocating that the budget for medical research and health-related concerns be increased — in strong opposition to the $billions$ of dollars the current administration includes as cuts in their proposed budget.

Won’t you join me?

It is unconscionable to attempt to balance the budget by putting the lives and health of MANY MILLIONS of American citizens at risk.

Making Sense of Remission

Don’t forget that you can always check out the sidebar
for a reminder of how links work on this site, they’re subtle ==>

Please come back tomorrow

I will resume my new posting schedule immediately – beginning with probably THE most important post I have ever written, about an issue affecting every single person reading these words.

UPDATE:  now available HERE.
(an edited, shorter version is available HERE)

 

© 2017, all rights reserved
Check bottom of Home/New to find out the “sharing rules”
(reblogs always okay, and much appreciated)

INCLUDING my late sister Jaye Griffith, brother-in-law Don Catrone, and friend and colleague Kate Kellyfound HERE


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There’s a lot to know, a lot here already, and a lot more to come – in this Series and in others.
Get it here while it’s still free for the taking.

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You might also be interested in some of the following articles
available right now – on this site and elsewhere.

For links in context: run your cursor over the article above and the dark grey links will turn dark red;
(subtle, so they don’t pull focus while you read, but you can find them to click when you’re ready for them)
— and check out the links to other Related Content in each of the articles themselves —

Related articles right here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com

A Few LinkLists by Category (to articles here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com)

About Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC
Award-winning ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching field co-founder; [life] Coaching pioneer -- Neurodiversity Advocate, Coach, Mentor & Poster Girl -- Multi-Certified -- 25 years working with EFD [Executive Functioning disorders] and struggles in hundreds of people from all walks of life. I developed and delivered the world's first ADD-specific coach training curriculum: multi-year, brain-based, and ICF Certification tracked. In addition to my expertise in ADD/EF Systems Development Coaching, I am known for training and mentoring globally well-informed ADD Coach LEADERS with the vision to innovate, many of the most visible, knowledgeable and successful ADD Coaches in the field today (several of whom now deliver highly visible ADD coach trainings themselves). For almost a decade, I personally sponsored and facilitated seven monthly, virtual and global, no-charge support and information groups The ADD Hours™ - including The ADD Expert Speakers Series, hosting well-known ADD Professionals who were generous with their information and expertise, joining me in my belief that "It takes a village to educate a world." I am committed to being a thorn in the side of ADD-ignorance in service of changing the way neurodiversity is thought about and treated - seeing "a world that works for everyone" in my lifetime. Get in touch when you're ready to have a life that works BECAUSE of who you are, building on strengths to step off that frustrating treadmill "when 'wanting to' just doesn't get it DONE!"

49 Responses to Surviving Cancer – a celebration

  1. Rae Longest says:

    I had breast cancer in 1999, which means this August I will be a 18 year survivor. I had drastic surgery (had the whole breast removed–I just wanted to get it out!) and did not follow up with either radiation or chemo. I am sure cancer will one day “take me out” but it will be another kind, not breast cancer.

    If back then removing the other breast had not been considered “cosmetic surgery” so that my insurance wouldn’t cover, I’d have given it up gladly.

    I faithfully get a yearly mammogram, and my sweet radiologist always gives me an ultrasound as per my gynecologist’s orders to follow up with an ultrasound. I am so blessed and do not often talk to women who have breast cancer because compared to the hell they have gone through with chemo, my experience was a “walk in the park!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • I feel the same way, Rae. Compared to what my sister endured – for years, my experience hardly counts for much at all.

      Congrats on being a survivor – and I am in awe of your bravery, opting for removal.

      Ya’ know, if testicular cancer were at issue, I wonder if the insurance carriers would consider any part of it “cosmetic” – or for a man with breast cancer, even. Hateful, money-grubbing industry long in need of an overhaul, IMHO.

      We have FAR to go on health issues in this country, but farther still on “women’s health” issues.

      Thanks so much for taking the time to share. May you remain healthy for the rest of a very long life.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 2 people

  2. reocochran says:

    Aww, so sorry you lost a friend, sister and brother in law. Sending you hugs, Madelyn. xo
    I had cancer on my ear at the top because I used to put hair behind my ear! The dermatologist said once I had a big slab cut off it, (by a surgeon) that he treats baseball young players due to forgetting to use sun protection lotion. This helps me remember to put high SPF lotion on little (and all ages) girls and boys on random body parts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Robin, for your kind condolences.

      Yiikes! EAR cancer. I am so sorry to hear that – but glad it was caught. I’ll bet you wear hats now, huh? I always do – year round, and even in the rain.

      And don’t forget sunscreen for the back of your hands, neck, decolletage, knees and tops of feet (mostly in the summer), – also areas we tend to overlook.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • reocochran says:

        Very great points, Madelyn!
        I have two deaths from my family of cancer: my Dad took 4 months of chemo and radiation inside organs. My Grandma on mother’s side died as she had breast cancer, mastectomy and treatment. She lived for several years, still dying in her 60’s.

        Liked by 1 person

        • So you know – I am so sorry to read that, Robin. My sincere condolences.

          We have so far to go to secure health and happiness in this country, it makes no sense what-so-ever to propose that funding be CUT for health-related concerns (and by billions!)

          But then, so little of what this administration proposes makes sense, I can’t say I’m surprised. Simply appalled.

          Do you think *everyone* on his team cut school during their science classes? They seem to understand absolutely nothing about it.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • reocochran says:

            I am shocked about their science backwards movement! I am horrified at how disrespectful he’s been towards leaders (England) and Godly people like Pope Francis who loves nature and shows forgiveness towards issues that other Popes have condemned. . . (Pill, abortions and pain from these guilts).

            There is so much I worry about which he basically is hateful about (women’s issues, ethnic, races, religious difference and immigrants.) We have complained about this but the list keeps expanding!!

            Hugs and thank you for such caring words. Dad was only 69.

            Liked by 1 person

            • So young to lose your father. I am so sorry. Mine lived healthily until his late 80s, but my mother died in her 50’s – pre-leukemic, they said – after enduring so many bone marrow biopsies she could not lie down without lying on a wound.

              WHY do so many surgeons fail to think first, operate second?

              Politically, I can’t barely stand to think about the hatefulness and ignorance at the top. Those people have the funds to have the best educations available, and yet they seem to revel in their ignorance.

              As for the president – he is simply arrogant and rude – again, no surprise. I thought the locker room story alone would be enough to turn off every woman in the country, and ALL fathers of girls.

              Apparently not.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • reocochran says:

              So horribly true and I never dreamed it would turn out the way it did. Every vote counted and not sure why young people didn’t support Hillary.
              Thanks for your chat tonight. Have a great rest of the week! xo 💐

              Liked by 1 person

            • You too. G’nite.
              xx, mgh

              Like

            • reocochran says:

              Not sure if I fully expressed my sympathy for losing your mother while she was so young, while you were young. . . Sorry to hear this, Madelyn. I’m going to try and catch up with my blog but did want to say this. ❤

              Liked by 1 person

            • How sweet you are. Thank you. You are one of the few who really understand, since you lost your dad so young. I am so sorry for both of us that we did not have them longer.

              My mother was my champion. I still wish she were merely a phone call away when I need an ear – and miss her like crazy every single time something good happens. She would have loved hearing ALL about it.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • reocochran says:

              Madelyn, I still just talk to my Dad in the car when I am alone or on a walk under the stars. I was blessed with a man who had nothing as a child and wanted to have children to be able to take part in our lives. Silly example but while practicing to diaper me, (the first of three babies) Mom says that Dad bloddied his fingers inserting his finger inside the cloth diaper to “practice pinning it.”

              He was hands on, no golfing, bowling or a bar to take him away. He was a boy scout leader, tree house builder and my partner at girl scout dances and totally hilarious when the square dance caller would say “alle mande left!!.” 😀

              Make sure you talk out loud to her, I think they can hear us. 💖

              Liked by 1 person

            • Oh Robin, what a lovely thing to read! He sounds like a wonderful man – and you were such a lucky little girl to have such an engaged father. It must have been devastating to have to say goodbye to that relationship so very early. I am so very sorry.

              I barely knew my father, really, and have only a tiny pocket full of memories of “engagement” – not overstating that in the slightest – and I treasure every single one of them. He was loving, yet emotionally distant in some fundamental way, with very strong opinions about the behavior and goals of children. Logical to the extreme. Strict, in a black and white fashion, which is odd for an otherwise extremely forward-thinking scientist when you think about it.

              I don’t believe he ever knew (or understood) me, his feminist, politically progressive daughter whose core value turned out to be “profound relating” — despite my attempts to connect throughout the years. A friend explained his view of his mother as “a hen who raised a baby duck, squawking from the shore when he jumped into the river to teach himself to swim.” My father didn’t squawk much after I left home, he just watched me swim away, shaking his head.

              After his death, I wrote a post here on the blog that contained practically everything I know about him, which I may repost on Fathers Day. Here’s the link, if you are curious: Homage to Brandy – the most amazing man I never knew. It’s a long post, but most people could write an entire book, given what they know about their fathers. I’m sure you could.

              I knew more about my mothers life, thoughts, hopes and fears, but it was a very different time in terms of what was “normal” in the manner that parents and children related to one another. It’s probably inappropriate, even today, to share everything about your life with your children. But at some point in adulthood it makes sense to me to take steps to relate human to human – as adults, escaping the reality that one of you raised the other.

              I’d like to believe that if my mother had lived as long as my father eventually did, we would have become extremely close friends. In any case, I loved them both very much and am grateful for the many things they did for me.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • reocochran says:

              I’ll read and save for Sunday about your mother, Madelyn. 💕

              Liked by 1 person

            • Father – and no rush. Later or never – both are okay.
              xx,
              mgh

              Like

  3. So happy you are a cancer survivor. When we hear stories of those that persevere it gives hope. Hope is always good. Cancer is a topic that we all dread to hear about but need to know about.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Like so much of the info we’d prefer to avoid thinking about. Hopefully, my attempts to put as positive a face on things as possible will help to raise awareness.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • It does, it is.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thank you for that.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Great posts. Heading towards my 1st year clear.😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • That’s great, Jo. I am SO happy to hear that. 🙂 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  5. joliesattic says:

    2 1/2 years clear now

    Liked by 1 person

    • GO YOU!!!! So happy to read that! Thanks for letting me know HERE.

      In just a minute I’m off to Tink’s Cheers bar to par-teee!
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • joliesattic says:

        Have one for me then!!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I’ll have half a one for you – I generally only have one before I switch to tonic and lime. 🙂

          Tink and I are back now – and Tink’s team Riff-Raff won the trivia tournament tonight. (We’re the mascots – no serious help at all with the categories chosen so far).

          I keep telling them to wait until neuroscience or psychopharmacology comes up – then they’ll see I’m no dummy. lol 🙂
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

  6. Chuck says:

    Hi Madelyn,
    Since you follow some of my writing, you know I’ve had cancer twice. My first was bladder cancer, followed several years later by Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. It will be three years ago next month that I was diagnosed with the lymphoma. I’m in remission, but the closer I get to five years, I can declare myself a survivor. It gives us hope seeing new drugs and technology in fighting cancer.

    It is especially necessary in the fight against cancer that we strengthen, not weaken, our health system. Thank you for your post and keeping the fight against cancer in the forefront.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Chuck – and congrats again for winning this fight TWICE now. Bladder cancer took my friend Kate only 9 months after diagnosis, so I am well aware of the daunting survival statistics and the difference in that type of cancer from all others.

      You are undoubtedly meant to be here for a reason.

      As to keeping up the fight – against cancer and ALL diseases of body and mind (and hoping to inspire others to do join in) – it is a mission. I hope you’ll be back tomorrow to read my next post – probably THE most important fight we need to win.

      Now go celebrate today, my friend — I think you have been inducted into the club TWICE!
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  7. daisymae2017 says:

    Are you a cancer survivor? If so, congrats to you. It might be just me but my opinion of cancer is once it’s there it’s always there. It just lies dormant if your lucky. Like I said, it’s just my opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I AM a member of the survivor club, as I disclosed in the brief article above – and I accept your congrats with a smile. Thanks.

      As to cancer always lurking in the shadows of survivors — the science says that every single person alive has “dormant” cancer cells, whether we have been diagnosed with cancer or not – which actually means that the immune system is healthy enough to beat them back and overcome them.

      I want to encourage my fellow survivors to remember THIS positive message, today especially:

      Stay strong so your immune system stays strong. Do not allow thoughts of anything “lurking below” into your mind.

      NEVER lose sight of the reality that you beat it back once.

      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I am glad you are a cancer survivor Madelyn. You inspire so many on your blog. 😍

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you – I have always believed there is always a reason when we are “shot and and missed.”

      “To those whom much has been given, much is expected.”

      You can’t be given much MORE than life itself, huh?
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • No. X😊

        Liked by 1 person

  9. noelleg44 says:

    This hits home – I have three friends, one of whom died from lung cancer, one is in remission and one is battling both lung and breast cancer (unrelated cancers). It’s a terrible disease, and I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. It makes me take stock of my life on a daily basis.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Noelle. It makes me sad to hear of cancer deaths, and I send light and prayers for healing for all who are battling still. It brings me joy to know of every remission.

      May your own life remain healthy for as long as you live.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

      • noelleg44 says:

        And the same to you, dear. A lovely wish. The friend with lung cancer used to come and curl up on my couch and sleep – she said she felt safe there. My husband found her a new oncologist when she became immune to the chemo – and he got her into remission.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Amazing how things like that happen, isn’t it? God bless your husband – and I hope the old oncologist added a page or two to his book.
          xx,
          mgh

          Like

  10. J-Dub says:

    Reblogged this on J-Dubs Grin and Bear It and commented:
    Sharing info. Cheers to all the survivors and cheers to those who have gone before.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much, J-Dubs, for sharing this reminder to celebrate living with your own readers.

      Who knows who will need a little ray of hope to make it through and find it from your site.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Glad to hear you survived. I’ve been lucky not to suffer first hand, but have lost family members young and old. Cheers,H

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Helen. The emotional shock of hearing the news was actually the most dramatic part of it – both that I had a significant melanoma in the middle of my upper back, and again when I was told that I was, once again, “statistically the same as those who had always been cancer-free” in terms of survival.

      Sympathy and empathy BOTH for your losses due to the fact that we have not YET found a cure for this dreaded disease.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Thank you for this post, Madelyn. My husband had a Stage 1 melanoma removed on Tuesday this past week. It was on his wrist so he had a skin graft which is quite unpleasant. Your post is very well time. Hugs to you and Tink.

    Liked by 2 people

    • My best wishes to your husband for a speedy recovery. I’m sure his doctors have cautioned him about staying out of the sun as well as the necessity of serious sunscreen for the rest of his life. May it be long and happy.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I sent a card to my bff who celebrates “7 years after” today…with a holiday like every year… and I hope there are a lot of this celebrations for her…

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m sorry your bff had to go through it, but I’ll bet the world will never be the same now that she (?) has come out the other side. It hasn’t been for me.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

      • she said she lives more intensive now… since she had to learn that a second can change everything….

        Liked by 1 person

        • They say, “Don’t sweat the small stuff.” It’s amazing how a diagnosis can make MOST of it small stuff.
          xx,
          mgh

          Like

          • nearly everything…. and maybe because it s like a wonder to survive life becomes a wonderful thing too after we won the fight…

            Liked by 1 person

            • Well, not exactly “wonderful” – there are still trials & tribulations – but somehow they don’t seem to be quite as big a deal when one has been taught gratitude for life itself in this manner.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

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