Naps help Memory


 Our Brains are not Designed
to Learn Non-Stop
Sleep is essential for memory & learning

©Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
from the Sleep and Memory Series
All Rights Reserved

National Sleep Awareness Week PostMarch 2 – 9

Sleep is more important than you think

Some preschools are still considering the elimination of naptime to fit in more teaching.

According to new studies,
that is probably a lousy idea.

Researchers have already shown that, following a good night’s sleep, facts learned one day are retained better the next, in learners both young and old.

It is looking like midday naps, discovered to be essential for brain development in infants, perform the same memory-enhancing function for toddlers and young children as a good night’s sleep for teen and adult learners.

Naps appear to help memory and learning

A study published in PLOS ONE suggests that a little snooze in the middle of the day may help kids retain information they learned earlier the very same day.

[Laura Kurdziel et al., Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children]

To repeat what I disclosed in an earlier article, Emotional Mastery to help us move forward:

Sleep has been proven to play a critical role in both physical and mental well being. Sleep deficiency is not only associated with physical disease, but also with a range of emotional disturbances from subtle to dramatic.

A great many important functions take place while our brains sleep — such as the healing and repair of the heart and blood vessels, as well as the brain’s housekeeping chores, when memories are consolidated and debris is swept away with the help of glial cells.

Other related neurodiversity posts:
You Don’t Want to Pay the Interest Charges on Sleep Debt
Sleeping with the Enemy: Mom’s N-24

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Preschool Z’s Make Good Memories

In the above titled article and podcast on the Scientific American site, Sophie Bushwick, a Senior Editor at Popular Science, reported on a particular study looking at how naps affected the academic performance in children between the ages of 3 and 6.

The study found that preschoolers who take a midday nap better retained recently learned information.

About the Study

Researchers taught 40 preschoolers between the ages of 3 and 6 to perform a memory task, followed by a break of several hours. After the break, the children were divided into two groups, one remaining awake or the other encouraged to nap. The nap group slept for about an hour and a quarter — an average of 77 minutes.

Later in the day, both groups were tested to see how much they had retained.

Although the brief nap appeared to make little difference in the children’s feelings of sleepiness, it did help enhance their memories. The children who had rested performed better.

Even more interesting was the finding that the children who had napped after the initial lesson retained more information the following day than those who had not.

The benefit was greatest for students who took naps regularly, by the way, not just during the study.  Which suggests, according to Bushwick, schools may want to keep sleep on the syllabus.

NOT just for Kids

A recent study reported on ScienceDaily on January 5, 2017, suggests that, upon retiring, so-called Seniors might also benefit from an hour-long midday nap.

It is looking like naps might well help deal with the short-term memory deficits accompanying what is often referred to as age-related cognitive decline.

To learn whether taking an afternoon nap had any effect on mental health, researchers examined information provided by nearly 3,000 Chinese adults aged 65 and older. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Study participants who took an hour-long nap after lunch did better on mental tests, compared to those who did not nap.

Those who napped for about an hour also did better
than those who took shorter or longer naps.

People who took no naps, short naps, or longer naps experienced decreases in their mental ability that were about four to six times greater than people who took hour-long naps.

Get this: the people who did not nap, and those who took shorter or longer naps, experienced about the same decline in their mental abilities that a five-year increase in age would be expected to produce.

About the Study

Nearly 60% of the study participants reported that they napped in the afternoon, after lunch. Their naps lasted between about 30 minutes to more than 90 minutes, with the majority of them taking naps lasting about an average of 63 minutes.

The participants took several tests to assess their mental status.

They first answered straightforward questions — like the current date, the season of the year, and so forth — and then were asked to do some basic math problems.

They were also asked to memorize and recall words, and to reproduce drawings of simple geometric figures.

Finally, they were asked questions about their napping and nighttime sleep habits to put the memory data in context.

Given the size of the study compared to studies of smaller populations, these findings are extremely encouraging as to reliability.

——————
Edited Summary
from “Afternoon Napping and Cognition in Chinese Older Adults: Findings From the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) Baseline Assessment” — appearing online in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Implications for ALL of us

I want to point out that younger and older participant groups are the ones that have been studied. The results DO NOT indicate that naps would not be equally useful for individuals outside the age ranges reported.

I would encourage anyone who has some scheduling flexibility – college students, entrepreneurs, and anyone able to retire at a younger age, for example – take the findings above as encouragement to adjust your schedule to allow for a midday nap.

And don’t forget that “mid-day” may not be the same time for everyone.
If YOUR daily schedule is not typical, your nap timing won’t be either.

NOT what was previously thought

You probably have read or heard that napping impacts night time sleep negatively.  That is likely to turn out to be old news.  The studies above seem to indicate that a nap of no longer than approximately an hour, and in the middle of the day, has no negative effect and may well turn out to be extremely beneficial.

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About Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC
Award-winning ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching field co-founder; [life] Coaching pioneer -- Neurodiversity Advocate, Coach, Mentor & Poster Girl -- Multi-Certified -- 25 years working with EFD [Executive Functioning disorders] and struggles in hundreds of people from all walks of life. I developed and delivered the world's first ADD-specific coach training curriculum: multi-year, brain-based, and ICF Certification tracked. In addition to my expertise in ADD/EF Systems Development Coaching, I am known for training and mentoring globally well-informed ADD Coach LEADERS with the vision to innovate, many of the most visible, knowledgeable and successful ADD Coaches in the field today (several of whom now deliver highly visible ADD coach trainings themselves). For almost a decade, I personally sponsored and facilitated seven monthly, virtual and global, no-charge support and information groups The ADD Hours™ - including The ADD Expert Speakers Series, hosting well-known ADD Professionals who were generous with their information and expertise, joining me in my belief that "It takes a village to educate a world." I am committed to being a thorn in the side of ADD-ignorance in service of changing the way neurodiversity is thought about and treated - seeing "a world that works for everyone" in my lifetime. Get in touch when you're ready to have a life that works BECAUSE of who you are, building on strengths to step off that frustrating treadmill "when 'wanting to' just doesn't get it DONE!"

94 Responses to Naps help Memory

  1. reocochran says:

    I would love to find time to nap! hugs xo So nice to hear supportive evidence to napping, Madelyn. 🙂

    Like

    • I can generally spare an hour in the middle of my day – but since I can’t control what time I will awaken (I don’t wake to sound), there aren’t many days when I feel I can chance a nap. If I had someone to make sure I woke up after 60-90 minutes I’d probably try to work in a nap for a long enough period to do a one rat study to see if it changes anything for me. Even in the studies, naps didn’t work for ALL of the participants, but many reported cognitive benefits I’d like to have.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  2. Reblogged this on Kate McClelland.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You have been a busy re-blogging bee this weekend! Thank you so much for including my posts as you hop around in your reading frenzies. I will always appreciate it. Are you napping?
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hahahaha I wish! I’m one of those people who can’t sleep during the day. If I do I can’t sleep that night!

        Liked by 1 person

        • You are not alone in that, Kate. The scientists say that, to reap the benefit without negatively impacting nightly chronos, we need to keep naps very brief and at midday (whenever that is for each of us) – but many of us struggle with limiting sufficiently.

          They’re still looking at naps, so it will be interesting to see how it all shakes out.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Friday Fun: Napland! | ADD . . . and-so-much-more

  4. dgkaye says:

    Hello my friend, from sunny Arizona. Wonderful article, and it only makes sense that we all function better on sleep. The Europeans and Mexicans have it right – afternoon siestas aren’t for the lazy, but rejuvenation! 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, but do you TAKE one every day? I don’t. Yet.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • lwbut says:

        I got to wondering last night (from considering this post)… Is there any difference between meditation, naps and simply resting one’s eyes? I’m thinking likely there is but that for many people maybe not that much? Would each one have specific benefits? Does one give the best results as far as brain performance or function?

        love.

        • Comparative benefit depends on who you ask, but in all cases different brain frequencies are dominant. Neurotypical brains have a preponderance of beta waves when awake — good for cognition, but not particularly noted for memory.

          Meditation (theta waves for experienced meditators) has a great deal of solid science behind it, especially since the Dalai Lama began meeting regularly with the neuroscientists and encouraging his monks to participate in studies. It is best known for increasing focus and reducing distractibility – which makes sense of course, and is likely to improve memory simply by increasing attention in the moment. It is theorized to have physical health benefits as well (probably due to stress reduction, I’m thinking).

          Resting your eyes, for any length of time anyway, usually results in what are called micro-sleeps – which I’m guessing would have similar benefits to short-term napping – but I am unaware of any studies supporting my guess.

          ANY manner in which we regularly step off the treadmill of ongoing accomplishment is good for brain health, however.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 2 people

          • lwbut says:

            Fully concur. Basically, time out to take a break from whatever it is you are doing, especially when it is scheduled, can only benefit your brain and health through reduced stress on our body. Not all individuals would acquire the same levels of reduction or benefit from each as others would – we would find greater benefit pursuing whichever we find works best for us.

            I should probably do more research into the brainwaves involved in them and which of the four broad spectrum frequencies are involved most in higher brain functions like memory retention, awareness and comprehension/analysis. 🙂

            Thanks for your input!

            love.

            Liked by 1 person

            • My pleasure. ALWAYS, once you’ve taken a look and are ready to share, if you post an article that relates to any of mine (old or new), leave a link in a comment below it. I’ll add it to the Related Content, bumping off somebody who never visits. 🙂

              No limit, btw, but no more than 1 link in each comment or you’ll get auto-spammed and I’ll never see it to approve.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

      • dgkaye says:

        Nooooooo, are you kidding me? Who has the time? LOL 🙂 🙂 🙂 ❤

        Like

        • LOL – even if you knew for SURE you’d get more done after a nap? The studies indicate ROI, but we doubt them – I know I do.
          xx, mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • dgkaye says:

            I’m with you, once again. 🙂 x

            Liked by 1 person

  5. Very interesting, have to look into it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • As I say to all – statistics are aggregates, people are individuals.

      If naps worked for ALL (or if everyone *could* nap), maybe more than 60% of the Chinese seniors would have reported taking them. Cheap to try, however. More info re: parameters in my answers to other comments – and a link to an interesting site.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you; you are a great source or resources, and I love it!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thanks, Dolly. Understanding how the brain works is my passion, and I always want to share.
          xx, mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • Mine too, but I find too many people who don’t even want to know, and most of them are the ones who should.

            Liked by 1 person

            • I’m with you on that opinion! I wish I could tie a few politicians to a chair and MAKE them listen.
              xx, mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • THEY have no brain to process information!

              Liked by 1 person

            • lol – too bad I can’t disagree, given their power over our lives, but I fear that you are correct.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

  6. daisymae2017 says:

    Reblogged this on COUNTRY LIVING and commented:
    I always did say a nap helps. Now I find out studies confirm my first thoughts. This is great. Thanks for the interesting and informative post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are a doll to reblog this, Crystal. Thanks so much for helping to spread sleep awareness information – especially since it’s Sleep Awareness Week! Good time to learn a bit about what goes on during the third of our lives most of us only think we spend “unconscious.”
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  7. lwbut says:

    Although i have lived in a ‘Mediterranean’ climate for nearly 50 years now i have never really understood the Mexican/Spanish concept of a midday Siesta and am usually well satisfied with my night-time sleep, i generally feel sluggish after any daytime naps i can get, not energised and find it hard to lose consciousness when i try to nap.

    Having said that after reading your post i can see logical reasoning to support the concept generally: the brain is a huge consumer of body energy – keeping it running on work/survival mode for long periods (ie more than 12 hours) at a time – the average day length – i think would be a drain on it’s performance levels, in the same way that constant stress will eventually deplete our bodies normal response abilities to said stresses. Taking ‘time-outs’ to allow the brain to recouperate a little should surely increase our waking efficiency and allow us to operate more successfully for longer.

    Also, learning i believe, is a function of memory – the better the memory the better you learn. Our brains require time ( and repetition ) to deeply ingrain what we experience into what we retain as learned behaviour. If we constantly absorb new experiences in succession we do not allow the brain sufficient time to integrate each experience into our longer term learning because each new experience involves slightly differing conditions taking place in the brain with successive ones causing interference in the preceding ones storage.

    Giving the brain a rest from more input would naturally allow it to better retain and keep those experiences prior to the nap buy retaining the conditions in the brain without replacing them with a newer response.

    I have long believed that the human species in it’s rushed and ever increasing desire for advancement has seriously misunderstood the importance of doing things at a slower speed and paying better attention to the demands of the body and nature upon us – like by taking the frequent ‘time-out’ for example.

    Well done on making more people more aware of the benefit of the nap… now if i can just learn it for myself! 🙂

    love.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a well thought out comment – thank you. And I believe you are right in your thinking on all counts — at least according to the science (both old and new, btw). Repetition and memory are to the brain are like salt and pepper on eggs. MUCH better together. In fact, without that repetition, little sticks at all. Why do you think teachers assign homework?

      Re: napping — There are other studies that might apply better in your case. John Medina (Brain Rules) quotes one — from his website:

      “Mark Rosekind, a researcher who used to work for NASA – his job was training pilots – actually did an experiment. He allowed his pilots to take a 26-minute nap, then measured their productivity. He found that productivity increased 34% if he allowed his charges to take a nap. He has a really great quote “What other management strategy will improve people’s performance 34% in just 26 minutes?” he is famous for saying. ”

      The key seems to be in the timing:
      short in duration at the midpoint of your day (i.e., 12 hours past the midpoint of your sleep). If you slip into Sleep Stages 2 and beyond, naps might not be as useful. Stage 1 often feels more like resting to most folks, btw.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • lwbut says:

        Thank you Madelyn, I believe you are right concerning stage 2 and even beyond sleep in my naps. I always equated napping with losing consciousness – something my brain activity frequently resists meaning i lie down thinking while waiting for sleep/nanna nap to come only to find an hour or more later i’m still thinking – thus completely defeating the purpose of the ‘break’. Either that or i wake up 2 hours later from deep sleep and feeling more tired than before i lay down – frustrating somewhat, albeit i imagine nothing compared to how you may sometimes feel?

        Am happy to trust Mr Rosekind’s research findings but my problem has always been achieving the nap state for 26 minutes within the time i would have allowed for the job.

        I might have to look up more of John Medina! 😉

        Thanks again, for both the tips and the re-affirmation.

        love.

        Liked by 1 person

        • When you lie down to nap, even if you are positive you are wide awake and thinking, if you experience feelings of falling or sudden jerking motions of the legs or whole body occurring at the moment you believe you are just falling asleep (hypnic jerks), you are probably already in Stage I. Let it be, and set an alarm before you lie down, and all will probably be okay.

          Medina is among the most “accessible” of the neuroscientists – and his website is informative without making you do a lot of work to dig out the nuggets. His goal in writing Brain Rules was to reach the educators and the managers (hoping to make those environments more human being – and brain – friendly). Yeah right!

          His second book is for parents, so maybe he can reach more the other groups that way. Thanks for your interest and your comments.
          xx,
          mgh

          Like

          • lwbut says:

            You’re very welcome on both counts, Madelyn. The older i get the better i understand my body and hopefully mind 🙂 – but i’ll never fully know it all or stop wanting to. The alarm idea is a good one – i learned to detest those things while working a ‘regular’ job and have not used one more than 3 times in the last 20 years – but i might start now! I recall one particular hypnic jerk as i was coming out of a deep sleep phase in which i kicked my full length bedroom window – any harder and there could have been a hospital trip involved!

            Have just been visiting Medina’s Brain Rules website – it may just become my new favourite site so big thanks for the intro.

            Sleep well! ( when you can) 🙂

            love.

            Liked by 1 person

            • lol re: window kick – nothing that dramatic to report here, but I have learned to welcome those little nightly jerks as an indication that I will soon be unconscious. 🙂

              Glad you are enjoying Medina’s site. Ginger Campbell has a super interview with him on her Brain Science Podcast (older – recorded after the book first came out, I believe, but still worth hearing). My article about the podcast is still available from my sidebar – you can get to her site and lists of content from there. If you are not already aware of this podcast, I’m willing to bet it is right up your alley.

              Thanks for wishing me well re: sleep. I’ve been fighting off a cold this week, which has left me sleeping MANY more hours, but at bizarre times. I just yawned, so maybe tonight will be an “early” night (lol – 3:15 AM as I type.)
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

  8. robjodiefilogomo says:

    Oh…and sent a quick email reply!!
    🙂
    jodie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks – will go look when I’ve finished responding to comments. Slept ALL day today, so I guess I’m not as far beyond my cold as I thought – and I’m now even farther behind on my to-dos. ::sigh:: 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  9. robjodiefilogomo says:

    I love hearing studies that fit in with my theories, Madelyn!!
    Not that I get to nap regularly….but every once in a while (now that i’m retired) it feels so good. And to think it really is good for us? I’m all in!!
    I sent this post to my step mom (the 60’s model in my blog) because I know she worries about her memory and yet she says it disrupts her night sleep. Maybe if she hears the info from you, she’ll be more apt to try it!!???
    Happy Weekend!!
    jodie
    http://www.jtouchofstyle.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, me too!

      The nap must be brief – no more than an hour, it seems from these studies. And not late in the day — after lunch, assuming a “normal” schedule.

      Tell your step mom it may feel more like resting (which is not a bad habit to incorporate anyway, right?) If she’s one who falls practically immediately into a deep sleep (where noises around her do not cause her to awaken), naps may not work for her, I’m guessing. I’m sure there’s a reason why only 60% of the Seniors tested already napped.

      Sleep goes through stages. The first stage is very light and many people cycle in and out of awareness of their surroundings. Many “insomniacs” mistake Stage I sleep for not being *able* to fall sleep and worry themselves alert.

      I have often thought that the reason why it take so long for many ADDers to “fall asleep” is that we spend longer than others in Stage I. No studies, so no evidence that I am aware of.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  10. When I was 5 and in Kindergarten the teacher made us take naps. Why I don’t know? Basically all you did in Kindergarten back in the 60s was color and play. I was not tired and didn’t need naps. I had lots of energy. Now that I’m in my 50s I need naps or rather all day sleep. I’m tired and exhausted all the time. However in the adult world jobs don’t allow you to take naps!! 🙂 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • lol. Supposedly, naps for kids are for brain development – as the study noted, they made no difference to “sleepiness.” The Senior study focused on memory enhancement, not energy.

      However, another neuroscientist has noted that a 1-hour nap 12 hours past the midpoint of when you fell asleep the night before will give you a 20-30% boost in functioning, and extend alertness by another 6 hours, approx. He thinks all businesses, if they “obeyed the Brain Rules,” would have couches for naps. It would be so cool if some forward-thinking company would actually test this!!

      If I can find the time, I’ll do a follow-up on napping, responding to the comments I have received on this one – and maybe massage a bit of content from the earlier articles in my Sleep Series <== link to ALL, for anyone reading who is interested in more.

      LOVED reading the birthday posts, btw.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  11. Madelyn! A Big Yes!
    ‘Naps Help Memory’
    This is a very very important subject to be discussed. It is my experience, because I take a Nap in the afternoon compulsory. Maybe for about 45 mins. If I am travelling on business most of it I cannot. But I insist to take a nap under a shade somewhere. Very rarely I miss. I feel everyone could practice it wherever and whenever possible.
    Other details I would not know like how you have discussed. But I can tell it really helps in many ways.
    I could not see your images or videos you have displayed as the net is not providing the display it is not fast. I shall see them subsequently.
    I agree and my 👍
    Regards
    Shiva

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the nap support, Shiva. The response to this article has been very interesting to me.

      Some, like you, are all in – others seem to be sure naps won’t work for them, and still others love the idea of it and wish they could but can’t, usually because of work or kids. I really need to find the time to do a follow up post to tie together a few loose ends.

      Don’t worry about the images – they merely illustrate the words and draw attention to the different content – no videos, so you have missed nothing.

      In only a few of my posts are the visuals instructive (like where parts of the brain are located, certain charts, etc. — and all memes, of course, like in the Friday Funnies.)

      Usually they are inserted to help with attention management. I am impressed that you are able to stay focused with the double distraction of a slow internet and missing graphics. Must be those naps, huh? 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  12. We completely agree with these studies and regularly succumb to a nap here and there. Now we have the stats to validate our desires. That little 20 minute nap puts everything back together again.. Great post Madelyn.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. John Medina (Brain Rules) has been saying this for years, and swears that we all have a sort-of nap set point that adults generally over-ride with stimulants of one sort or another.

      As I respond to comments on this article, I am increasingly eager to do a follow-up piece. So much misunderstanding about sleep in general, not just naps.

      BUT, I want to remind us all, statistics are an aggregate. There will always be outliers (no pun intended). 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • It is interesting as I read your articles and do some side searches on the topic how society often makes us feel guilty for sneaking away for a nap. Like we are missing out on life because of it. Our lives are full and that nap on occasion is a wonderful way to refuel. Since retirement it has been great to bury the watch and allow our bodies to go back to its natural rhythm (including naps). Stress, lack of sleep… its no wonder people are dropping dead.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Modern society has much that needs rethinking – IMHO. According to Medina, where life and habits are involved, we totally ignore what we’ve discovered about how the brain works – that if we set up school, work, etc. to deliberately make it the most difficult possible to accomplish stated objectives, we would do nothing different.

          But will society listen? Not about much anymore (especially since Nov. and ignorant opinions are now tweeted as alternative facts.) ::sigh:: Maybe I need a nap?
          xx,
          mgh

          Like

          • We share your sentiments. The conflict the world can inflict is brutal at times. Its taken many years to rid myself of guilt for not doing what the world says is the way to go. It seems to be getting worse. I feel for our younger generations. I think we need a nap too, lol. It’ll be better in the morning…. maybe, lol.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Probably not “better” in the AM – but we’ll be better equipped to deal with it . . . maybe! 🙂

              You seem to have finally shrugged off the shackles of the world’s expectations in any case — and found a partner to share your wanderlust — so I’d call that a huge success. Congratulations.
              xx,
              mgh

              Like

            • Good morning! It is a beautiful brisk morn with everything blanketed in a fresh coating of snow. World politics are still the same but my attitude is positive, lol. Yes, have shrugged off most of the shackles layered on by the world and life, in great health, have a partner extraordinaire and am filled with a constant flow of joy. Its funny but years of working in the trenches taught me that life truly is about having faith, loving, patience, putting one foot in front of the other and realizing there will be good days and there will be bad days but key is attitude. It seems you are in that spot too?

              Like

            • We got snow too. Truly bizarre weather this time of year – but how lovely to awaken to such a positive comment. Agree re: attitude, but mine is a bit iffy of late. I’m probably on the mend, since I am a beginning to feel grouchy (the move from zombie to pitiful to grouchy is always my first sign that health is returning – lol)
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • We don’t believe for a moment Madelyn that you have a grumpy bone in that body. Besides Tink wouldn’t let it happen. I remember my mom saying there would be days like that but she didn’t finish by saying “sometimes days”, lol. Tomorrow the sun is going to shine… partially occluded by snow, clouds and frigid temps. Tried to cheer you up but I probably shouldn’t have mentioned the part after the sun. Oh well I cannot tell a fib, lol.

              Like

            • Everyone has a grumpy bone, you guys – it’s like a funny bone, only lower. 🙂

              Frigid? Oh nooooooo. I normally love winter weather, but since I caught this cold I have been trying to get warm for a week now – seriously swaddled and heater huddled. I think poor Tink has forgotten how to play outside, it’s been so long. (Remind me when I start Grumping about summer, okay?)
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Lots of rest, lots of fluids and lots of lovin on Tink will cause that cold to leave. We’ll remind you come summer and temps hit 80’s what we felt this past week, lol. I don’t think I have a grumpy bone, umm well don’t ask the mate though, she might provide a detailed list, lol.

              Liked by 1 person

            • I think temperament a matter of bone size relativity. No studies, of course. 🙂

              My body has put me down for the count, as usual. I’ve been sleeping practically ’round the clock (4PM and just now awake) — downing fluids and vitamins on awakening – and little Tink has been a dear. It’s lifting – slowly.

              I’m usually amazingly healthy, physically, so I really can’t complain (much!)
              xx, mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Rest, Rest, Rest. You are keeping a fast pace and ya gotta keep your strength up. You have people looking to you and you can’t do that with a tissue in one hand and a aspirin in the other, lol. Besides poor Tink needs his regular potty breaks.

              Liked by 1 person

            • He has a pad inside a special tray in the house – so he’s okay there – but he misses his long walks for sure! If it would warm up just a bit I could still manage those, but not when I’m freezing.

              I’m off to take a nice hot bath as soon as I get through the comments left while I was sleeping.

              You guys take care of yourselves too – wash hands often (before touching your face when you’ve been out and about) & toss tissues after one use. The science guys say that’s the best way to keep rhinoviruses from moving in and taking over. It’s gotta’ be miserable to get sick on the road – and what will you blog about if you are forced to stay home? Sights from the sickbed? 🙂
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Good tips. Rest, Rest. Tomorrow is another day and it will be better for sure.

              Like

            • Thanks. Be well, and thanks for reading & interacting.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

  13. -Eugenia says:

    I can’t take naps because I wake up groggy and with a head ache. With that said, I sleep well at night. My husband and our cat take naps together. So cute.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There will always be exceptions to any study, Eugenia. If it were true for ALL they wouldn’t have to study it, right?

      I am sure that if we hooked you up in a sleep study we’d find it has something to do with a deeper sleep stage when you nap – but I can’t imagine why we’d want to, as long as what you are doing works for you. You no doubt restore with some alone time when the rest of the house is napping. I would!

      You are one of the lucky ones who sleep well at night – many do not. Don’t mess with success?
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • -Eugenia says:

        😃

        Liked by 1 person

  14. I fully agree with this, Madelyn. I’m well aware of the detrimental effects of the lack of it. Sleep is also very healing. Though I had not thought about the connection between memory/learning and sleep… I can see it.

    One of only 2 bosses in my long career who ever “turned me loose” to really use my skills would often toss me a huge writing challenge. Challenging for the diverse things he expected me to connect and segue in a single written page.

    The first time I told him, “I’ll have to sleep on it,” he seemed stunned that I’d say that. “I’m not saying I won’t do it, but I need to let it settle in my mind. I’ll give you something tomorrow,” I added.

    Well, he was very pleased with the result. There were several times after that when I had to tell him “I’ll sleep on it.” But after that first time, he would get excited at my reply. “I know it’s *really* going to be good when you say that!” he said. (Too bad he was just one in the revolving door of my bosses…)

    TGIF and mega hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great story, Teagan – thanks for sharing. I wish stories like this were part of the metrics-obsessed biz-school curriculum. So FEW bosses really understand the diverse manner in which employees produce their best work. Yet every guru blogger out there seems to be selling some “way” that is supposed to increase productivity.

      My young friend “J” needs frequent, ongoing check in points for encouragement, sort of mini-deadlines – but the manager can’t be a make-wrong artist or micro-manager or he shuts down. I find almost any “check-ins” beyond intrusive and highly disruptive. If I get stuck I’ll work it out or ask for help. Don’t bug me!

      One college roommate was practically your opposite – she had to start a project the moment it was assigned or she’d lose her momentum. I’m like you in that regard, but if she “slept on it” she was doomed. And BOY do I hate fake deadlines. If I burned the midnight oil to make sure you got what you need from me, do NOT let me find out it is not actually due for another week. You just lost my faith in you forever – and from now on you’ll get a call instead — telling you to plan on getting my part of the project by the “real” deadline, because I’m going to BED! 🙂

      TGIF & hugs to you too.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Unfortunately that boss didn’t help me when he left… And the next was jealous and insecure… And systematically destroyed my career. The last five years have been pure hell. I’ve been trying that entire time to get something – anything back in the southwest, but no luck. Now I’m just trying to get something in a smaller city, with a warmer climate.

        Liked by 1 person

        • REALLY sorry to read that, Teagan. Can you change fields — or get a job in a service sector while you look for something in your field? I sense we are similar in temperament, so I don’t know how you are standing it. (similar thing in my life happened when I was barely out of college).

          I might have stayed in PR but for one particularly incompetent, insecure, sexist a$$hole who really took advantage of me – aided and abetted by a sexist firm, I might add. If they had appreciated me to begin with, he never could have done it to me.

          I, too, started with a super boss – female PR director, btw. – who left almost as soon as she’d trained me because they wouldn’t pay her what she was worth. She took the time to write me a glowing letter of recommendation before she left, which should have been a BIG clue. I flew solo for about 6 months while they searched for her replacement, and I had no expectation that I was in consideration for the job, even though I was keeping things together currently. My work-life tanked the day this male idiot arrived — worthless, took credit for ALL my ideas (even those before he was hired, btw) – and tried to demote me to secretary (vs. asst. PR Director).

          When he convinced the agency I no longer needed an expense account (or biz cards!) and left me “to hold down the fort” while he & the Pres. represented the firm at market (after I’d done ALL of an amazingly large amount of work and set up some truly clever promotions that sort of put a client on the map for for that market), I QUIT. Can’t remember how truthful I was about why. I’d certainly give them an earful NOW, that much I know, but I was young, naive, very hurt, and still learning the ropes and the rules.

          Went back on the road as an actor, despite the pay downgrade and job insecurity. Decided I’d rather be a struggling actor than used and abused in a clearly sexist field (at the time – no idea how it is now). “Idiot’s” send off was rude, unnecessary, and telling, “Well, you were a lousy secretary anyway.” Obviously, it still gets my goat, decades later.

          I heard from a colleague on the ad side, less than 3 months later, that “idiot” was gone. They fired him – colleague wouldn’t say (or didn’t know) why or what happened. Hardly kind of me, but I hope it cost the firm that client, so that the lesson really hurt and was crystal clear — would have served them right for not seeing that the guy couldn’t do the job while he was trying to hide behind ME. May ALL sexists get hit in the wallet!!

          Anyway, since I was no longer putting my shoulder to the wheel of this small department in a mid-size ad agency, they had nobody to do the work while they conducted another executive search. Ha! And that, as they say, is where two roads diverged for me.

          I hope something breaks for you very soon. I feel your pain.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • Thanks for sharing that Madelyn. Writing/editing is what I enjoy most and do best. I achieved that in a career change from admin work (after I got my degree). The field is not really the problem, just the management at my gov agency. Insecurity and jealousy seems to be a requirement for the execs they hire…

            Now I’ve reached the point where age is an undeniable issue in getting a different job.

            One female hiring manager in TX — I was having a stellar interview and hitting it off with the team. She however, had been detained and didn’t make the interview. So I got a second interview when she called a short time later. She kept bringing things back to my age…

            Anyhow, I keep learning developing skills so that I’m qualified as technology changes. I keep trying to get something else, private or gov. After five years of failing to get anything, I keep trying everything I can. Thanks for commiserating. I think I’m coming down with a cold — maybe for once my body will cooperate and let me take a nap! 🙂 Hugs.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Yeah – so much for ‘against the law’ to consider age (or ask questions about it). Hang in there. My 50-something friend Andy is on his 3rd round of interviews with a company that *prefers* age and experience, given updated skills. Their concern seems to be whether he’ll stay, since he is clearly “overqualified.” So he has been hitting hard on company “fit” (which is darned near perfect, actually).

              I’m just getting over my cold, so I’m commiserating there as well, after a week of sleeping practically ’round the clock. Start pushing lots of fluids, along with vitamin C and echinacea with golden seal – I swear by both and start them with the first sneeze. Other than exhaustion, my symptoms have been relatively mild, thank you Lord!

              Hot baths with Epsom Salts help too – some say the salts clear toxins. I don’t know about that, but they do get me warm back down to the bone.

              Then, of course, you could always go to work and sneeze all over that manager. By the time you’re feeling better, s/he’ll be home sick! 🙂
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

  15. noelleg44 says:

    Thank you, Madelyn, for relieving my guilt at sneaking in a nap in the afternoon. Usually 45 minutes to an hour, and I get a second wind for doing things afterward, especially writing! My night time sleeping is not long since the dog gets me up without fail between 5-6 AM.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The author of Brain Rules, John Medina, says you are doing it the right way – and supports your experience of “second wind” – he claims a 20-30% increase in performance is to be expected following a well-timed nap (following your body prompts), and that you can prevent degradation of cognition for another 6 hours following. Nap ON!
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  16. Scott Nagele says:

    I can’t remember the last time I had a good nap.

    Liked by 1 person

    • heh! heh! heh! 🙂

      Seriously, I’ve never been a napper either, and am trying to figure out how to work one in as a personal test. With my sleep-timing disorder, I’m just getting up about when others in my timezone would be napping. By the time it is “midday” for me, the expectations of my availability are peaking as folks are getting home from what they do to keep body and soul together, so it’s tough to stop right then.

      However, I’m willing to try anything claiming to give me a functional boost! I can use all the help I can get.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

      • Scott Nagele says:

        I think I have a sleep-timing disorder too. Only in my case it’s called three kids.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Funny! With three you get eggroll.
          xx,
          mgh

          Like

  17. mistermuse says:

    I have trouble getting a full night’s sleep, so I take naps (involuntary ones while reading or watching TV)! 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • Believe it or not, your way of sleeping is one of the norms: several shorter periods of sleep vs. one long stretch. Apparently quite the adult norm before electricity – very early family bedtime to conserve candles, mid- night period of quiet tasks upon awakening for the adults, then back to bed until “morning” – whenever that was for all of them.

      Of course, drooling as your head falls to one side when you sit to read is not part of the model. 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  18. GP Cox says:

    If I take a nap, I can’t get to sleep at night – so – for me no naps! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • It sounds like you’ve tried and know how YOUR body reacts. If you can’t, you can’t. We all have areas where we are the exception that proves the rule. My fear is that I won’t wake up (sleep disorder, not death, btw). 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Kip(British term I picked up in ’94 & Nana Nap! I’m a huge fan e en after coffee…..and only an hour? I struggle waking after only an hour. I live for my off-grid weekends so I can kip til my hearts content. And now it’s Friday night! Who Hoo!🤗

    Liked by 2 people

    • You can follow the beat of your own drum, except for dealing with carers, etc. – and many of us struggle with hour naps. A sleep cycle is 4 hours for most of us, so an hour nap is a very shallow sleep – almost like skimming, more like resting. I guess that’s why the studies found that the naps didn’t affect feelings of sleepiness particularly – but they certainly seem to help retention.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  20. I for one….am all for naps. Yay for napping! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • And NOW we have a good excuse – we’re consolidating our learning. Science says so. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Great and thanks so much for this wonderful informative post Madelyn. Sleep is so important for each and every person. You have given us such beautiful information and so very inspiring too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment. Now go take a nap – lol.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

      • Hahahaha i hope i could right now dear it is 1.00 in the afternoon.

        • The perfect time, according to the studies. I, on the other hand will be heading to bed for the NIGHT, ere long.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • K good night sleep well.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Thank you, my sweet friend. I hope you squeeze in a nap yourself.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Oh K for sure dear.

              Liked by 1 person

  22. Zara says:

    Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Zara. I’m not sure how, but I plan on working in a nap if I can.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  23. thanks for this post… I wish I could find the time for a nap… Phenny takes a nap for recharging his batteries… that probably means he is smarter than me ;o)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well yeah – just ask him. Tink too, btw.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  24. A very informative post. My mother, aged 77 years old, naps every day. She is still very active and her memory is good, particularly considering that she had treatment for cancer two years ago which does impact on your memory (according to her doctor). I am a big believer in day time naps for small children and toddlers and both of my boys slept during the day until they were four years old and went to nursery school. They have regular bed times and I am quite inflexible about that. Shared on twitter and FAcebook @SirChocolateBooks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for commenting, Robbie, and especially for sharing.

      Your mother is a good testimony for napping – cancer treatment is hell on brains – which is why I always include the cancer awareness days on my monthly mental health posts.

      RE: bedtime — Your kids will hate you now and thank you later. Parents who don’t insist on structured bedtimes are taking a big chance with their kids’ health. Once chronothythms become dysregulated, they’re not that easy to regulate, so they might have life-long sleep problems.

      Funny story re: bedtime. I asked a client once, trying to determine if he had any systems at all in place, “So what time’s bedtime?” His bufuddled answer: “I didn’t know adults even needed bedtimes anymore.”

      Yep – NO structure what-so-ever! 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  25. Pingback: Everything you ever wanted to know about SLEEP | ADD . . . and-so-much-more

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