ABOUT the Mental Health Writers Guild


A new badge on my sidebar
and one more item I can cross off my to-do list

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
from the Walking a Mile Series

No longer languishing undone

I’m doing my happy dance to be able to announce, finally, that ADDandSoMuchMORE.com is now included among the many other wonderful blogs on the membership roster of the Mental Health Writers Guild.

For those who are not already aware, The Mental Health Writers’ Guild is a voluntary, non-profit, non-professional community.

It exists to encourage positive, informative, inspirational writing supporting Mental Health Awareness, advocacy, encouragement, information and help.

It seeks to provide and promote a community open to all bloggers and writers who write articles which are either directly or indirectly related to mental health and mental well-being in an affirming – and non-commercial – manner.

Gettin’ A Round Tuit at last

It has been my intention to submit ADDandSoMuchMORE.com for membership seemingly forever, but something always jumped in front of it on my to-do list.

  • When I finally had the time and focus last year, the life of the site creator and administrator wasn’t in a place where he could keep up with the administration required, so was unable to respond to requests for membership for a time.
  • BoldKeven (also blogging at Voices of Glass) checks out every blog personally, to make sure that member sites reflect positively on one another and on the Guild, then adds a link to blog of the newly approved member on the Guild’s Membership Page.

All’s well that end’s well, right?

Don’t forget that you can always check out the sidebar
for a reminder of how links work on this site, they’re subtle ==>

Welcoming Member Links Here

If anyone who reads or rings in on ADDandSoMuchMORE.com is also a member, displaying the Guild badge in your header, footer, or on your sidebar with a link back to the membership site, please feel free to leave a link to a recent post in a comment below.

After all, it takes a village to support a world.

Click badge to find out how to get one for YOUR blog

Not yet a Member but want to become one?

Click the badge at right to find out how to go about it.

Click HERE if you want to submit a new and previously unpublished article directly to the membership site.

Click HERE for a blogroll of Guest Posts already published on the Mental Health Writers Guild’s site.

Don’t Forget: Group Coaching will be starting soon.

This low-cost format is designed especially to support anyone who would like a bit of professional coaching when money is tight.

Click HERE to read all about it, and HERE to grab your seat while you still can!

© 2017, all rights reserved
Check bottom of Home/New to find out the “sharing rules”
(reblogs always okay, and much appreciated)


As always, if you want notification of new articles in this Series – or any new posts on this blog – give your email address to the nice form on the top of the skinny column to the right. (You only have to do this once, so if you’ve already asked for notification about a prior series, you’re covered for this one too). STRICT No Spam Policy

IN ANY CASE, do stay tuned.
There’s a lot to know, a lot here already, and a lot more to come – in this Series and in others.
Get it here while it’s still free for the taking.

Want to work directly with me? If you’d like some coaching help with anything that came up while you were reading this Series (one-on-one couples or group), click HERE for Brain-based Coaching with mgh, with a contact form at its end (or click the E-me link on the menubar at the top of every page). Fill out the form, submit, and an email SOS is on its way to me; we’ll schedule a call to talk about what you need. I’ll get back to you ASAP (accent on the “P”ossible!)


You might also be interested in some of the following articles
available right now – on this site and elsewhere.

For links in context: run your cursor over the article above and the dark grey links will turn dark red;
(subtle, so they don’t pull focus while you read, but you can find them to click when you’re ready for them)
— and check out the links to other Related Content in each of the articles themselves —

Related support right here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com
(in case you missed them above or below)

A Few LinkLists by Category (to articles here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com)

Related Articles ’round the net

  • I’m hoping that they will be displayed in the comment section below!

BY THE WAY: Since ADDandSoMuchMore.com is an Evergreen site, I revisit all my content periodically to update links — when you link back, like, follow or comment, you STAY on the page. When you do not, you run a high risk of getting replaced by a site with a more generous come-from.

About Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC
Award-winning ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching field co-founder; [life] Coaching pioneer -- Neurodiversity Advocate, Coach, Mentor & Poster Girl -- Multi-Certified -- 25 years working with Executive Functioning struggles in hundreds of people from all walks of life. I developed and delivered the world's first ADD-specific coach training curriculum: multi-year, brain-based, and ICF Certification tracked. In addition to my expertise in ADD/EF Systems Development Coaching, I am known for training and mentoring globally well-informed ADD Coach LEADERS with the vision to innovate, many of the most visible, knowledgeable and successful ADD Coaches in the field today (several of whom now deliver highly visible ADD coach trainings themselves). For almost a decade, I personally sponsored and facilitated seven monthly, virtual and global, no-charge support and information groups The ADD Hours™ - including The ADD Expert Speakers Series, hosting well-known ADD Professionals who were generous with their information and expertise, joining me in my belief that "It takes a village to educate a world." I am committed to being a thorn in the side of ADD-ignorance in service of changing the way neurodiversity is thought about and treated - seeing "a world that works for everyone" in my lifetime. Get in touch when you're ready to have a life that works BECAUSE of who you are, building on strengths to step off that frustrating treadmill "when 'wanting to' just doesn't get it DONE!"

80 Responses to ABOUT the Mental Health Writers Guild

  1. Congrats! I have been meaning to contact you . I have just received some exciting news. Maybe you would like to be a part. Contact me when. You can…tj

    Liked by 1 person

    • Unfortunately, unless it comes with a paycheck I can’t take on anything new right now. My schedule is jam-packed already with pro-bono efforts, and I simply must spend the remainder of my time keeping a roof over my puppy’s head and food in both our food-bowls.

      I’m already struggling to keep up with blogging actions: writing/reading, comments/responses, and (NO thanks to the glut of marketing spam) slogging through email is currently beyond me, except for responding to clients or students. I’m obligated to prioritize their concerns, including phone time – part of what they pay for.

      Thanks for thinking of me.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  2. dgkaye says:

    Congrats to you Madelyn. Well deserved my friend! I’m glad to see that your creativity is recognized by other too. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re a doll to take time to read and acknowledge. Thank you so much.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • dgkaye says:

        But of course I would! 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        • awwwww!

          Liked by 1 person

          • dgkaye says:

            Liked by 1 person

  3. GP Cox says:

    About Sheri de Grom
    Retired Fed/JAG, 5 yrs. on Capitol Hill. Former book buyer for B and N. Concerned citizen of military drawdown.

    Currently involved in mental healthcare reform, health care strategist and actively pursuing legislative change wherein dual retirees are exempt from enrolling in Medicare at their own discretion without losing tertiary healthcare benefits. Monitor and comment on Federal Register proposed legislation involving Mental Health, Veterans Affairs, Health and Human Services, Medicare and rural libraries.

    Licensed OSHA Inspector to include Super Fund sites. Full time caregive to Vietnam era veteran. Conceptualized, investigated possible alternatives, authored, lobbied for, and successfully implemented Title X, Section 1095 (known as the Third Party Collection Program of Federal Insurance).

    LINK to Sheri’s Site

    Liked by 1 person

    • She sounds like my kind of woman. I will check her out. Thanks so much for making me aware of her (and for a link to her site)

      btw- I can’t tell from my current screen if I am already following YOU or not. I mean to be, and I believe I am – but as soon as I can see some indication of my “status” I will make *sure* I am. Your blog is fascinating.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • GP Cox says:

        Thank you very much. I know you and Sheri will get along great.
        I’ve gone into the list of people following me, going back 2 months and I do not see your name. Maybe it was before that?

        Liked by 1 person

        • I couldn’t find the widget (or whatever) that allowed me to follow from a comment, so I jumped over to your site, and could see a “follow” button there – which I clicked to rectify a long-standing oversight.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • GP Cox says:

            No problem.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Jumped over to Sheri’s site, even though today’s to-do list is overlong already. I read her most recent (yea for the VA!) and left an introductory comment, letting her know that I was following on YOUR recommendation. Also mentioned The Mental Health Writers Guild. Thanks again.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • GP Cox says:

            Thank you, Madelyn. Sheri does so much for so many, with so little in return for herself.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Unfortunately, that is often the case for those who set out to make a difference for others. In contrast, those who set out to increase their own “fame and fortune” (especially the latter!) seem to garner a great deal in return for their efforts – no matter who gets hurt in the process. It does make one wonder, doesn’t it?

              It also turns my stomach!!!

              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

  4. GP Cox says:

    I want to put you in touch with Sheri deGrom. Her qualifications are spectacular and she started a program in the Little Rock VA called Helping Hands that is constantly growing, literally taking on a life of its own. I believe the Mental Health Writer’s Guild should invite her, she teaches so many!

    Liked by 1 person

    • They don’t “invite” – one must apply. I let Sheri know of my article announcing my own recent affiliation on a comment under her VA & Women’s health article. If she chooses to follow through, I have no doubt she’d be approved, given what she writes about.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • GP Cox says:

        Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. akiwifreund says:

    Congratulations! As always, your work and your word is invaluable, and the accolades are well-deserved! Much love!

    Like

    • Much love BACK, especially following that incredibly positive comment. Thank you.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  6. Congratulations on your new membership! I am sure it will bring more readership to your articles and more clients who will undoubtedly benefit from your expertise.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you. From your lips to G-d’s ears (using your way of writing it).

      I wish everyone who is struggling would spend 3-6 months working with me. They would not believe the positive difference in their functioning once they understand *why* well enough to develop their own work-arounds and systems — instead of continuing to try to follow generic tips and tricks.

      Unfortunately, I can barely get them to read what I spend a great deal of time putting online for free. I join you in the hopes that perhaps Guild membership will make a difference.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • My husband claims that when I talk, He usually listens, so my blessing on your membership should be beneficial. What you call work-around, I call bypass strategies, but it’s the same concept. What do you think of neurofeedback?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thank you for your blessings on my behalf, either way — and I like the term “bypass strategies” very much.

          As for neurofeedback: that’s a long discussion, but I ‘ll try to Cliff Note. In a nutshell, I have mixed feelings about it.

          With enough time and money, and with a comprehensively trained practitioner, I know personally that brain wave entrainment is possible and can be beneficial in a number of arenas besides focus.

          But it’s not the “cheaper and easier fix” that some claim. Even the field leaders have said “a destabilized brain tends to destabilize easily” — meaning that it’s not a “fix” so much as a balancing. “Update” sessions to “rebalance” become necessary for many.

          It’s not a quick fix, either and “training the brain” to increase SMR beta waves (for example) does not remediate skills or fill in missing ones – which also takes time, as you know. A teen struggling and in danger of flunking out of school, or ready to drop out (or a marriage or job in danger), isn’t likely to have that kind of combined time, even if funds are plentiful for the repeated sessions.

          What has been your experience, and why do you ask?
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • In my school, we had a fully equipped neurofeedback lab (I wrote a grant and got lucky!), and was trained as a trainer, to train therapists. Granted, on its own it would’ve been marginally effective, but combined with intensive therapy and behavior modification, as well as individually tailored instruction, we were able to achieve significant results. Definitely, it requires a serious investment from parents, but neuroplasticity allows to create those bypasses. The problem arises when parents buy equipment on E-bay and try the “quick fix” DIY approach. Just curious: have you worked with any parents who have done it, or are thinking of doing? Oh, and I almost forgot one more component of our approach:modified diet at school and diet suggestions for parents.

            Liked by 1 person

            • As you so aptly point out – it is a complex puzzle that is best attacked on more than one front — including cleaning up diet problems that exacerbate symptoms. Expecting a quick fix is simply naive, but huge improvements are certainly possible with time and diligence.

              I’m jealous of your lab! 🙂 How marvelous for you and your students. I wish ALL schools had neurofeedback labs and trained practitioners – that strikes me as the perfect setting for neurofeedback success.

              Were you able to take advantage of it yourself? I worked as a “lab-rat” with a therapist colleague/friend while she was being trained, btw – and for some time afterwards. Many stories from that period of time.

              I have not worked with DIY parents, but the majority of my practice has centered on adults focused on their own challenges. It takes an unusually dedicated parent to be willing to take the time to learn to work with his/her own child in a brain-based fashion, I have found.

              I have cautioned a few in both camps against spending money hoping for computer success in that manner. Most of the outside studies indicate that most of the supposed “gains” don’t translate to improvements outside the platform they’d be buying. Kids “win” commercial video games all the time, and still struggle at school, for example.

              I have heard excellent reports about the Merzenich approach to reading struggles, however: Fast ForeWord, which encourages me to think kindly toward his other offerings. As the neuroscientist who has been ringing the bell for neuroplasticity for several decades (only relatively recently successful getting the attention of his colleagues), he does rigorous testing before claiming that any of his equipment or approaches might be useful (and in which arenas) – which can’t be said of the claims of the many others with machines and software of various types (especially one particularly popular online).

              Now that you are retired, what happened to your school?
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • During my last three years as a director, I hired and trained an excellent ESE educator to take over seamlessly. Obviously, brilliant young people do things their own way, so certain models and practices are discarded and new ones are implemented, and I think it’s great. I was a “lab-rat” for three days of training, and it had no effect on me because I don’t have attention or processing deficiencies, thank G-d. In addition, I am very visual, and the system we had, PlayAttention, was based mainly on processing visual stimuli. We did not use FastForeWord, but another private school (a mainstream school) did, invested tons of money, and got very little in terms of results. We were much more effective with “live” certified reading specialists and even student interns. Next question: are you familiar with Dorothy Rich’ Megaskills for Success?

              Liked by 1 person

            • Aren’t you gracious to be able to turn over the reins so completely. Still, if you know your successor well, I suppose if things are working, it’s not too difficult to detach from the particular manner in which the results are produced — as long as it is not in opposition to what you believe, that is.

              I have read positive reports on PlayAttention as well, and am saddened to hear that FastForeWord didn’t produce results for the private school to which your referred. It’s not surprising that “live” tutoring produced better results, however. Personalized attention usually does, in my experience.

              Joel Lubar was in Knoxville during my time there after I left NYC (his son & partner lived in my ‘nabe, and we chatted on my dog walks). As I’m sure you know, Lubar has been recognized for his expertise with “EEG biofeedback” and attentional dysregulation, but my therapist friend didn’t train with him, preferring to go over the mountain to train in NC (Ashville, I believe). She wanted to work with one of the developers of a particular protocol (names escape me at present, but he is well-known). I believe his software was what she used as well – on two computers: one for the “rat” and one for the practitioner to watch results and set levels and “rewards.”

              While I did get results, and a few later sessions showed brain-wave patterns in the “normal” range (certainly NOT where I started), it was not nearly as effective on “real” world tasks as medication, in my case — and results didn’t last even an entire year.

              Re: Dorothy Rich’ Megaskills for Success — No – I’ll have to google it in the next few days.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • I had to retire for family reasons, so I am grateful that I had enough time to find I the right person and to train him to the point where I felt comfortable turning the helm over to him.
              In my experience working with neurofeedback, supported by training and backed up by research, children require 60 to 120 sessions to produce long-term results, and then repeat sessions after 6 months or so. Adults are nowhere near as trainable, although some improvement could be obtained, provided all the other “pieces of the puzzle are there, i.e. a full comprehensive program, from A to Z, of the kind that we had for kids.
              I am interested in your opinion regarding Megaskills. I was privileged to meet with Dr Rich and secure her permission to develop an evaluation model based on Megaskills. She passed away a couple of years after that, but the system is still out there.

              Liked by 1 person

            • I may not be able to take time to investigate very quickly, but it IS on my list, and I’ll let you know. It sounds like, given our chats, that if you find it useful, I will as well.

              I’m sorry your life mandated retirement, but how nice that you were able to have trained the man who took over, so you could leave unconflicted.

              Your experience with neurofeedback timing mirrors my own – and I might have found my own results more stable had I been able to do repeat sessions over time. Life changed, I moved away, and jumping thru the hoops to find practitioners (and come up with the bucks) were not items I could accomplish, given what else was going on at the time.

              I wonder if the kids who went through your program have any idea how incredibly fortunate they were (and are)?
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • No rush, I know you are busy. Once you review the indicators, if you like what you see, I’ll be happy to share my evaluation model with you. I found it an extremely useful tool working with teachers and parents, even when I consulted long distance. I have to tell you, though, that I have modified the indicators slightly, with Dr Rich’ permission.

              Yes, I was truly fortunate because I kept worrying that I would run out of time, and the school would be left rudderless. Thank G-d it didn’t happen!

              Some of the kids appreciate the chance at functional and productive life they got, some don’t realize the difference, but all of them, without exceptions, love me back because they know I love them! We go to their weddings, their college graduations, their children’s birthdays, etc. Ah, don’t even start me on this – they are MY KIDS!

              Liked by 1 person

            • I wish I had a bunch of “kids” like that in my own life. 🙂

              Thanks for your offer to share your model. I have no doubt that I will be taking you up on it.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • As I said, no rush. I think it might find it helpful, but if you are are using some evaluation and assessment models already, I’d be interested to know how they compare.

              Liked by 1 person

            • I’m eager to see that too!
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Whenever you’d like, but I really think it best if you review the indicators first.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Will do. Unless you coach adults, you probably won’t find my assessments particularly useful, but you might be interested in seeing them.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • I don’t coach anybody any more, but I am still interested to see what’s out there.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Makes perfect sense!
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Sometimes I do make sense – I surprise myself!

              Liked by 1 person

            • lol – more often that I, I’m willing to bet!
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • Don’t bet on extraneous variables!

              Liked by 1 person

            • And aren’t they all? Still, I believe I’m right to bet on this one.
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

  7. well done & congratulations Madelyn xx

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Kate. It feels GREAT to cross something off my always very long list of intentions and to do-s — especially this follow-though leading to Guild membership.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well deserved Madelyn!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Not that it is a merit association – or one requiring thousands of hours of practice (like my coaching “initials”) — but membership IS vetted, and I’m thrilled my blog has been accepted. Thanks again for the kudos – accepting gratefully.
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

  8. ellenbest24 says:

    Congratulations! Madelyn.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you, Ellen – and thank you for coming to read and for taking time from your life to let me know you did. MUCH appreciated!
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • ellenbest24 says:

        I will be back and I comment as respect and payment for the posts I read. My blog is genre free so you never know what you’ll find, poetry, story, book reviews, humor and flash fiction. I just come here to procrastinate from my writing… perverse i know.😇

        Liked by 2 people

        • Um, I think “perverse” means, “you can relate, right?”

          My blog centers around the Mental Health field (mostly – lol), but that’s a broad enough topic that you never know what you’ll find on ADDandSoMuchMORE.com either (thus, the name).

          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • ellenbest24 says:

            Perverse… rebelious. I come to write on my blog when tired of or stuck on editting my novel…how bonkers is that quite the busmans holiday. I personally am a tad bonkers as all the most interesting people are. 😉😇

            Liked by 1 person

            • But of COURSE. “Normal” is not the goal – extraordinary is the goal. And extraordinary people are *never* normal (and most often more than merely a tad bonkers). 🙂
              xx,
              mgh

              Liked by 1 person

            • ellenbest24 says:

              😘

              Liked by 1 person

  9. Chilly says:

    Reblogged this on The Powers That Beat.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you SO much for, again, helping to spread the word about the importance of Mental Health Awareness, education and support.

      AS said before, we are probably on our own with the incoming corporate capitalist administration – not very friendly toward health of ANY sort, other than that of their personal fortunes.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  10. Eugenia says:

    Congratulations and well deserved! Reblogging to spread the word.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you SO much, Eugenia- from me, the other great Mental Health Awareness, Information and support blogs, and all of the people who are struggling and looking for help that knows what it is talking about! We are ALL so very grateful.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  11. Bernadette says:

    Congratulations and I shared this with my young friend Allison Green.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Bernadette. The Mental Health Writers Guild is growing (God bless Kevin’s administrative skills and willingness), and outreach is the reason why.

      There is so much bogus info on the web these days, this badge on a sidebar helps those who struggle separate the wheat from the chaff. I doubt we all agree, but at least no one who displays one is selling snake oil!

      Thanks for sharing.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Well done ✅ Madelyn. This is also very useful information xx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks – it feels great to finally be able to identify this blog as a Guild member. Thanks for reading, and taking the time to comment. Much appreciated.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks to you I’m looking into it to xx

        Liked by 2 people

        • Wonderful. Tell Keven where you heard about it when you apply. I have no particular clout, but it couldn’t hurt. 🙂
          xx,
          mgh

          Liked by 1 person

          • Definitely xx

            Liked by 2 people

  13. Reblogged this on findbooksinside.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Whoa! I’m working my way down the comments, so I just replied to you. Then I find this and I’m blown away.

      Thank you so VERY much for helping to spread the word about the Mental Health Writers Guild, and that ADDandSoMuchMore.com is a member-blog.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

      • Welcome!

        Liked by 2 people

  14. boldkevin says:

    Really pleased to have your blog as part of the guild 🙂 There is a very real need to more sites having a positive impact on people’s understanding of Mental Health and Mental illness. Many thanks for the mentions! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’re quite welcome, Kevin – and thank YOU for everything you do. That membership roster must have taken hours upon hours alone! I’m not sure if this article will get anyone to click to join (a great many of my followers are writers and other creatives, not mental health bloggers – but at least more people will know about the Guild.

      Off to B-E-D. It’s after 4:30 AM here (DSPS-N24!)
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Zara says:

    Congratulations!! So very well deserved. Keep up the great work xx 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much, Zara. I’m chuffed (as they say in New Zealand) that my blog has been accepted for membership — but must add that it does not mean they *endorse* ADDandSoMuchMORE.com (or any of the blogs they accept)

      STILL, I’m proud to be a member, and mighty pleased to have one more completion under my belt – wind beneath my wings for the new year.
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 2 people

  16. reocochran says:

    This is a great way to network and spread your helpful and valuable work, Madelyn. Congratulations! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks Robin – I hope it spreads the word far and wide!
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

  17. Patricia says:

    Congratulations!!❤

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks, Patricia! I’ll take the congrats for my follow-through. Membership is not exclusive, and carries no endorsement.
      xx,
      mgh

      Like

      • Patricia says:

        Follow through is sometimes the hardest thing to do!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Only sometimes? 🙂
          xx, mgh

          Liked by 1 person

    • I second this!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Thanks! You’re a doll to ring in to let me know.
        xx,
        mgh

        Like

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