Overwhelm – Over IT!


Conserving Cognitive Bandwidth
Learning to create the mental space in which to work

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
from the Time & Task Series

Give me the Strength to . . .

ACCEPT the things I cannot change,

the courage to change the things I can,

and the wisdom to know the difference.

And NOW, what they left out . . .

Ahem!  Just a few important little pieces:

  • The INFORMATION necessary to be able to change a few things, once we’ve figured out which is which.
  • Encouragement inspiring hope to serve as wind beneath our wings.
  • And the cognitive bandwidth necessary to stay on track long enough to change much of anything.

Did you know?

Brain-space is not an unlimited resource (at least not in the bottomless well meaning of unlimited).  Yeah, sure, we have an almost unlimited number of pathways connecting billions of neurons — but what about all the new traffic lights and crossroads?

Our brain is designed to conserve cognitive resources.  Once it learns a few routes, it tends to like to stick to them, even once our life experiences have, effectively, rearranged more than a few roads.

As Tony Robbins is credited with saying,
If you do what you’ve always done,
you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.

If we want to get something different, we need to update our maps. 
(Group Coaching, by the way, is designed to help you do exactly that.)

Acceptance and Surrender

Let’s begin by taking a look at that acceptance part of the equation — before we surrender too easily.

When we devote a great deal of our time and attention to things we cannot change, we expend physical, emotional and mental energy that could be directed elsewhere more productively.

That’s true. It’s like pushing a rope – lots of side to side action, but no forward movement. But . . .

Just because we never have
doesn’t mean we never can.

Don’t take my word for it.

  • Ask Nick Verron or Clark Elliott — both of whom made “impossible” recoveries after brain damage they were told they would have to learn to live with until they died.
  • Or maybe you’d like to read about Dick Hoyt, who was told that his newborn son Rick would be an uncommunicative vegetable for the rest of his life.

Click those links to see just how impossible their situations turned out NOT to be!

Even the Wright Brothers were told that man could NEVER fly.

We do, however, need to change our strategies, develop new habits designed to keep our brains from overheating and shutting down on us, and put a few systems in place to keep us keepin’ on.

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