*NEW* ADD/ADHD Medication Rules: 5 Resources


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

Free downloads – gifts from Dr. Charles Parker

 by Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
An article in the ADD Advocacy Series

If you haven’t been over to Dr. Charles Parker’s “new and improved” CorePsych Blog yet – for a wealth of information you won’t find anywhere else – maybe a “bribe” or five might move it to the top of your list.

“There ain’t no IS about ADD” ~ mgh

Fellow ADD advocate (originator of a TON of web content and author of two “Rules” books now), Dr. Parker is one of the physician crusaders for specificity – of diagnosis and of treatment approaches.

He insists that we need to take a detailed look at a whole lot more than
many of his collegues realize, and that the look must be individual specific.

The checklist below is from his download link page — another of my “reblog” work-arounds: a few points to consider as you think about why YOU might be interested in what he has to say.

Full Disclosure: he doesn’t even know I’m doing this, so he certainly isn’t paying me to do it!

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Brain-Based Coaching Basics: watch videos, change your brain


Remember – links on this site are dark grey to reduce distraction potential
while you’re reading. They turn red on mouseover.

Parts of the Brain and What They Do

Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC
Another article in the Brain-Based Resources Series

from wikimedia.org, Creative Commons

“Hardwired” — out of the box — that’s what we’ve always believed, and with a uniformity of structure and function that neuro-surgeons count on.

But brain surgeons have always known
that’s not all there is to the story.

Did you know that, as far as we know right now, the brain itself has no pain receptors?

At least, once a a surgeon gets through what we usually refer to as “the skull,” the brain itself does not need to be anesthetized.  The patient feels no pain.

That’s a good thing, too, because the surgeon may need the patient to be wide awake for the surgery.

Why?

The surgeon knows better than almost anyone that, because no two brains are exactly alike, patient feedback may well be necessary to make sure that areas needed for vital functions don’t get damaged in the process.

They really can’t take much of anything for granted when they are operating on an individual brain. Not only are we all BORN with brains that are uniquely our own, as we grow and learn and experience day-to-day events, our brains change.  Literally — structurally.

Our brains are as unique as our fingerprints: like snowflakes, no two alike!

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