Senior Moments?


The Heartbreak Of CRS

© Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, CTP, CMC, ACT, MCC, SCAC

We ALL fall victim to CRS many times throughout our lives – more and more often as we age.

  • Many opportunities for advancement and success are lost to CRS.
  • CRS devastates self-esteem.
  • Sometimes entire lives are ruined when CRS rears its ugly head.

Question Mark in red circle; magnifying glass attempting to make it clearer.While the kids might substitute a different word for the last letter in the acronym, we all find it unbelievably frustrating when we have a CRS episode – those times when we simply . . .

        Can’t Remember Stuff !

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So Tough on Self-Esteem

It’s bad enough when we can’t recall a name in the middle of an introduction.

It’s worse when we can’t remember where we put our keys when we’re running late.

It’s awful when our minds go blank when we’re taking an exam after we’ve studied long and hard for several nights in a row.

  • We are embarrassed when we forget birthdays.
  • We feel ditzy when we have to go back into the house several times to check that we turned off the lights, locked the back door, or unplugged the iron.
  • We feel stupid when we forget a basic fact we haven’t pulled out of our mental databases for a while – like how to divide fractions or figure percentage, or the spelling of a common word, for example.
  • We worry that we might be getting SENILE when we can’t remember entire events – like going to see a specific film with a certain person who is absolutely positive we were there with them, stunned when we still don’t remember once they supply details to support their case.
  • If we don’t remember seeing the film at all, we begin to worry about incipient Alzheimer’s!

What’s even worse

The real heartbreak of CRS, however, is that we will never be successful in our lives unless we are able to stay in action toward our goals!  If we can’t remember to DO what we intended to do, when we intended to do it, how can we possibly expect to stay in action?

  • All of us have times when we are so distracted by other events in our lives that we don’t take the time to write it down – even important stuff.
  • THEN there are the times when we aren’t focused enough on our game plans to remember to check our reminders – like the notations in our DateBooks, or the post-it notes we sprinkled around the house to make sure we didn’t forget an important event.

What’s going on here? Are we brain dead?

  • Are we too stupid to understand what’s appropriate and what’s necessary?
  • Does it mean we don’t take our goals seriously?
  • Are we unconsciously sabotaging ourselves?
  • Maybe it means we have unconscious conflicts, or fear of failure.
  • Maybe its fear of success!
  • Perhaps we’re just plain LAZY.

Nah!

Maybe, just maybe, remembering enough to take action is a factor of a of attention and focus I would like to make a case for the fact that it IS. 

And there’s A LOT to come to help you understand what’s going on and help you learn to work around it — so STAY TUNED (and keep clicking through).

If you’re at all interested in just how bad it could be, check out Remembrance of Selves Past to take a gander at what those of us who’ve been dealing with ADD/EFD glitches all our lives have had to work around.

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Shared on the Senior Salon

———————————-
This is the first of a series of articles on the link between attention, focus, activation and memory.  The information is pre-publication content from my new book Intentional Attending,™ eventually to be out as an eBook and TeleClass series.  Sign up for blog notification if you want to get the content while it’s free!


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There’s a lot to know, a lot here already, and a lot more to come – in this Series and in others.
Get it here while it’s still free for the taking.

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Related articles right here on ADDandSoMuchMore.com

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About Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC
Award-winning ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching field co-founder; [life] Coaching pioneer -- Neurodiversity Advocate, Coach, Mentor & Poster Girl -- Multi-Certified -- 25 years working with EFD [Executive Functioning disorders] and struggles in hundreds of people from all walks of life. I developed and delivered the world's first ADD-specific coach training curriculum: multi-year, brain-based, and ICF Certification tracked. In addition to my expertise in ADD/EF Systems Development Coaching, I am known for training and mentoring globally well-informed ADD Coach LEADERS with the vision to innovate, many of the most visible, knowledgeable and successful ADD Coaches in the field today (several of whom now deliver highly visible ADD coach trainings themselves). For almost a decade, I personally sponsored and facilitated seven monthly, virtual and global, no-charge support and information groups The ADD Hours™ - including The ADD Expert Speakers Series, hosting well-known ADD Professionals who were generous with their information and expertise, joining me in my belief that "It takes a village to educate a world." I am committed to being a thorn in the side of ADD-ignorance in service of changing the way neurodiversity is thought about and treated - seeing "a world that works for everyone" in my lifetime. Get in touch when you're ready to have a life that works BECAUSE of who you are, building on strengths to step off that frustrating treadmill "when 'wanting to' just doesn't get it DONE!"

8 Responses to Senior Moments?

  1. Bernadette says:

    When the children were small, it was like living with three little boys who were having senior moments every hour or so. It is a major problem for people with ADD and one that I can appreciate now that I am the one having those moments every once in a while.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have heard that comment SO much as my friends age. Finally, I get some respect for dealing as well as I have all these years – lol. 🙂
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Lisa Orchard says:

    Informative post! Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    • Thank YOU for reading and commenting!
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  3. robjodiefilogomo says:

    I must admit, that I’ve given up trying to be perfect and remember everything. It’s such a load off my entire being to be able to say to someone, “i’m sorry, I don’t remember your name.”
    Attention & focus—easier said than done, right?
    jodie
    http://www.jtouchofstyle.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • I now explain that names and faces don’t always “stick” with my brain, but if they will remind me what we talked about I will remember THEM. They are always stunned when it usually “works” lol
      xx,
      mgh

      Liked by 1 person

  4. seeker says:

    Wow, plenty of materials to ADDed. Thank you for the links.

    Like

    • Thanks, seeker, for taking the time to comment AND for the “like” — and you’re welcome for the links. Thank YOU for creating content I can link TO. LOVE your article (and actually lol’ed)

      BTW, and way off-topic – as a double Sag, I t-totally relate to “seeker” — “I seek” is the key word to frame the Sagittarius come-from. (Don’t run my life through the lens of Astrology, but I seek out information from a number of fields in my attempt to make sense of consciousness, so I did study it for a couple of years long ago – thanks to a metaphysics mentor who was into it as a technology to objectify consciousness — works for ME!)

      xx,
      mgh

      Like

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